Help Gear advice

Tanki

Maximum Pace
Aug 7, 2014
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#1
Sorry for the threadjack, but I think I could learn something new. I have an old 53/39 105 crankset on my bike with a 9spd 14-25 cassette. I am out of the saddle grinding away on climbs. I have been told that the current rear derailleur won't take more than the 25. Advice on my options for getting the lower gearing that comes with the latest 105 cranksets would be appreciated.
 

Tanki

Maximum Pace
Aug 7, 2014
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#7
What about Sugino XD2 (for example 48+34)? If you spin out on the 48, just freewheel and enjoy the scenery.
Nice and compatible with Shimano9spd. Thanks.
@GrantT The rear derailleur is 105 HD 5501 so I might have another cassette option?
@TCC I don't have 11spd block so is there a compatibility issue with the latest 105 cranksets?
@Half-Fast Mike I am dreaming of maintaining a good cadence. My understanding is that my old bike won't take a 10spd block. Though I cannot explain why, being quite limited in the tech savvy department.

All advice much appreciated.
 
Apr 3, 2012
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Boso
#8
What model is your current rear derailleur? Chances are you can put a 28t cassette and it will work fine (if the chain is long enough).

http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/687210-shimano-105-rd-28t-cassette.html
This. And also buying a new rear derailleur is much cheaper than buying a new crankset if it comes to that. Cheap low end Shimano derailleurs work wonderfully. You can get an old 8 or 9 speed MTB rear derailleur for next to nothing and run up to a 36 tooth cassette in back.
 

GrantT

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Oct 2, 2012
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#9
Based on the conversation in that link I posted, your RD should work with a new 9-speed 28t cassette. For the steep climbs in Japan a compact crankset would be ideal though. An FC-3550 Sora compact crankset is 9-speed so should work fine with your current front derailleur (I am guessing though).
 
May 22, 2007
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halffastcycling.com
#10
@Half-Fast Mike I am dreaming of maintaining a good cadence. My understanding is that my old bike won't take a 10spd block.
Quite possible. You might need a new rear wheel (or to rebuild the wheel on a new hub) to become 10/11S compatible. Opportunities for advancement are limited only by your budget.

W > b x 6

i.e., should own at least three pairs of wheels per bike owned: everyday wheels, training wheels, race wheels.

Of course I'm joking... I forgot Sunday group ride pose bling wheels, eh @macrophotofly ?
 
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Apr 3, 2012
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Boso
#12
Quite possible. You might need a new rear wheel (or to rebuild the wheel on a new hub) to become 10/11S compatible. [/USER] ?
Somebody could prove me wrong, but I'm pretty sure all Shimano 8 and 9 speed freehubs are also 10 speed compatible. You just need a spacer underneath the cassette.
The problem with going 10 speed is you would have to change the shifters.
 

Tanki

Maximum Pace
Aug 7, 2014
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#14
@Tanki If you need a wheel building, I can do it for free for you; you just provide the parts.
@TCC Thanks for the offer.
My free hub isn't 10speed compatible according to my local shop. So I will probably go with a Sora 9spd and compact crankset and new chain as suggested by @GrantT. The shop say that will work. @hat and beard 's super budget option is a possibility. A 10 or 11spd upgrade I will save for another year or two, or a new bike.
Thanks for all the input.
 
Apr 3, 2012
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Boso
#16
My free hub isn't 10speed compatible according to my local shop.
This doesn't really matter if you don't want to switch to 10 speed, but I'm 99.99999999999999% sure your bike shop is wrong. The more I've learned about bikes in the last few years the more I've realized that most bike shops don't know a whole lot about bikes. 8, 9 and 10 speed Shimano free hubs are exactly the same. Quoth Sheldon Brown:
hubs marked "8-speed", "9-speed" or "10-speed" will work with any number of sprockets!* (Add a 4.5 mm spacer before installing a 7-speed cassette on an 8-, 9-, or 10-speed hub., and the included 1-mm spacer before installing a 10-speed cassettes on an 8- or 9- speed hub.)
*Sheldon was writing pre -11 speed.
I have switched between 8 and 10 speed cassettes on the same hub without any problems.

Anyhow a compact crank will do you well. Enjoy.
 

joewein

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Oct 25, 2011
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joewein.net
#17
I have also upgraded from 9 speed (105 5600) to 10 speed by simply changing the cassette, chain and the right shifter (Tiagra 10 speed 4600). The cassette and chain were worn out anyway, so the shifter was the only real extra expense. You can keep the 9 speed RD, the indexing is done in the shifter. I have a RD-5700-GS (medium cage).

There are Tiagra 4600 or Ultegra 6700 cassettes that support 12-30 (10 speed). With a 9 speed MTB RD you can go as high as 11-36 (e.g. SRAM PG-1070 11-36 or 12-36).
 

Tanki

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Aug 7, 2014
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#19
Update: after watching the cassette change video posted by @hat and beard on the helpful thread I have had a good look at my hub and cassette. I have 105 FH 5600 and to the naked eye and a between the chainring insert the thickest thing possible test, the chainrings are evenly spaced. It doesn't look like anything can be replaced with something narrower to accommodate an extra ring. I will take the wheel to some other shops today for a second and third opinion.
 

GrantT

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Oct 2, 2012
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#20
I have 105 FH 5600 and to the naked eye and a between the chainring insert the thickest thing possible test, the chainrings are evenly spaced. It doesn't look like anything can be replaced with something narrower to accommodate an extra ring.
Are you now planning to upgrade from 9-speed to 10-speed? The 10-speed cassette rings as a whole will be placed closer together than the 9-speed cassette. It is not simply a case of adding a ring to the 9-speed cassette and making a 10-speed cassette. (Link)
 
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