Garmin city navigator for Japan

Jan 13, 2010
39
0
16
Victoria, BC
#2
I've used free maps downloaded from OpenStreetMap for several tours. If all you need is the actual roads with routability then they're fine. Unfortunately place names etc are complete mojibake (Romanization of Chinese readings of Japanese). Only J-model Garmins will display kanji (at 3x the price).
 

j-sworks

Maximum Pace
Feb 5, 2012
1,199
48
68
Tokyo
#3
I've used free maps downloaded from OpenStreetMap for several tours. If all you need is the actual roads with routability then they're fine. Unfortunately place names etc are complete mojibake (Romanization of Chinese readings of Japanese). Only J-model Garmins will display kanji (at 3x the price).
Will the j-model display all other data in English? For example the data fields like direction and so on, and the menus?
 

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
1,199
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68
Tokyo
#7
The UPUPDOWN maps seem to work pretty good.

http://uud.info/en/map/

They have alot of embedded info like POI's, Address search, elevation data, etc. The only negative I've found is that they are pretty heavy compared to V3 on my Garmin 705
Thanks Tim, when you say "heavy" do you mean the file size? As long as they fit on Japan on one card that's probably fine - I think.
 

GSAstuto

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Oct 11, 2009
945
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tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#8
The map goes on the microSD card - no problem there - except the V4 map requires a little more than 2GB card - this is where the problem may lie. I use a 4GB card and it's a bit funky. Slow as well, compared to the V3 map on the 2GB card. Not sure if anyone else is experiencing this, though. Just overall the V4 map is slower to render and calculate compared to the V3. But it does have alot more information.

Thanks Tim, when you say "heavy" do you mean the file size? As long as they fit on Japan on one card that's probably fine - I think.
 
May 22, 2007
3,617
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#10
To answer the original question - iiyonet is the official Garmin distributor. JPY 19,590. If you buy a Japanese model Edge 800 it comes with this map and/or the Japanese topo map.

The UpUpDown map costs somewhat less, depending on the format you want, and has the option of road/POI data and Topo data in one product.

UUD4 does occasionally route me up and down stairs (and once an actual ladder) on inner-city fugawe jaunts. YMMV
 

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
1,199
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68
Tokyo
#11
The map goes on the microSD card - no problem there - except the V4 map requires a little more than 2GB card - this is where the problem may lie. I use a 4GB card and it's a bit funky. Slow as well, compared to the V3 map on the 2GB card. Not sure if anyone else is experiencing this, though. Just overall the V4 map is slower to render and calculate compared to the V3. But it does have alot more information.
That makes adds up, if there was more detail on maps of other Garmin devices I've had then they take more time to render.

I won't be using it find the nearest post office or whatever, but to find my way through routes that I get from people (gpx or whatever) and to find a meeting spot.
 

j-sworks

Maximum Pace
Feb 5, 2012
1,199
48
68
Tokyo
#12
To answer the original question - iiyonet is the official Garmin distributor. JPY 19,590. If you buy a Japanese model Edge 800 it comes with this map and/or the Japanese topo map.

The UpUpDown map costs somewhat less, depending on the format you want, and has the option of road/POI data and Topo data in one product.

UUD4 does occasionally route me up and down stairs (and once an actual ladder) on inner-city fugawe jaunts. YMMV
I'd probably go with the Garmin original product, and as long as the 800J will display all data fields and menus in English then I'd go for the set. I can see this being helpful to do the odd new route, retrace old routes, and plan out some new rides here or wherever in the world.
 
May 22, 2007
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#13
I'd probably go with the Garmin original product, and as long as the 800J will display all data fields and menus in English then I'd go for the set. I can see this being helpful to do the odd new route, retrace old routes, and plan out some new rides here or wherever in the world.
Be my guest, if you have the cash to spare. I think it works out at just about twice the price of doing it all in English. The Japanese model definitely can be switched to English mode.
 

j-sworks

Maximum Pace
Feb 5, 2012
1,199
48
68
Tokyo
#14
Be my guest, if you have the cash to spare. I think it works out at just about twice the price of doing it all in English. The Japanese model definitely can be switched to English mode.
I was referring to the the maps from Garmin not the unit, but can I not use the regular 800 with the Garmin city navigator for Japan? Or do I have to use the 3rd party ones?
 
May 22, 2007
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#15
I don't think you have said, at least in this thread, whether you already have a GPS or whether you are contemplating buying one.

1. If you have or get an English (US or EU) model, then you will not be able to meaningfully use the official Garmin City Navigator maps on it; the maps will display but all labels will be illegible. So you will have to use either the UpUpDown map or OpenStreetMap. (As JD says, the OpenStreetMaps have serious labeling issues.)

2. If you have or get a Japan-specific model, then you can use the Garmin maps. You can switch the menus between Japanese and English, but the map labels themselves will always be only in Japanese. Whether this is a good thing or a bad thing depends on your kanjibility.

Scenario 2 costs approx twice as much as scenario 1.

You have the option to use as many map sets as you wish, swapping them using MicroSD cards.
 

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
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#17
I actually have a forerunner and now I have the cadence and HR so I am looking to get something with more screen, and I'm contemplating the value of the maps because the unit and map cost is significant.

I am happy to get this good info because it seems that a 500 and the iPhone will do if I cannot find where I am going, the 500 will give all the essential info plus course navigation, and if I can't find something then I could take out the iPhone.

The j model with maps is nearing the $800 mark in Canadain, that's too steep for me.
 
May 22, 2007
3,617
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#19
You're welcome.

The actual utility of the iPhone depends how far you are planning to go, especially in the mountains, and how concerned you are about becoming lost. Softbank reception is typically the first to disappear, but with a mapping GPS unit you'll always be OK so long as you have battery power.

I've been using GPS for cycling since 2006 - first one was a yellow eTrex held on to my bars with knicker elastic. Now my Edge 800 records every turn of the crank, every beat of my heart, every twist and turn of the route.

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j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
1,199
48
68
Tokyo
#20
You're welcome.

The actual utility of the iPhone depends how far you are planning to go, especially in the mountains, and how concerned you are about becoming lost. Softbank reception is typically the first to disappear, but with a mapping GPS unit you'll always be OK so long as you have battery power.

I've been using GPS for cycling since 2006 - first one was a yellow eTrex held on to my bars with knicker elastic. Now my Edge 800 records every turn of the crank, every beat of my heart, every twist and turn of the route.

proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fimg442.imageshack.us%2Fimg442%2F2232%2Fp1010021zd.jpg&hash=0ec78b5d3fbbc8a5ae555e175b537327
I had one of those too, funny to see how far the technology has come.

I live close to Hachioji and I ride the mounties all the time, I hope AU is a little better and it's so far been fine.

The last thing I want is to be lost in a ride and lift my head and realize that I'm lost with no help, I ride alone often, and two other things for me are taking/finding new routes and being able to navigate without riding with my iPhone in one hand.

Everytime I settle on the 500, I think about the above. So I'll need to consider this more.