Ride For any TCC 'tilers'

Half-Fast Mike

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I wonder what's gonna take to get the one on the NW slopes of Fuji.
Thank you for the props. I'll admit to being a little obsessive about my tiles. Feeding my obsession has the great benefit that I visit new places all the time... although some places are more hospitable than others.

There's a handy, little-known trekking trail, 御中道, from 5th station around to the great rift. That'll take care of a couple.

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For the whole mountain, I can't see any tiles that don't have a road, track or trail somewhere, although not all lines on a map can actually be navigated.

that SDF blight to the right
This is the problem. I discussed with a former JSDF rifleman (the only person I've ever met who actively hates Mt Fuji). He told me 'you'll be fine, the locals, who own the land, go in and out all the time to pick mushrooms and collect logs'. I'm thinking summer 5 a.m. excursions/incursions - before any live firing starts!
 

Karl

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@Half-Fast Mike That was quite an adventure and a great write up! Gonna have to download that route for some future misadventure. I was hoping to do more Mt. Fuji stuff this year but it didn't work out. Glad to see someone is doing what has to be done! I'll be lucky to get my Chichibu area tiles done this year. Way behind 'the plan.'
 
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Karl

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Heck of a couple of days.

Got to Chichibu at 8:50, on the bus at 9:10, arrived at Mitsumine shrine at 10:25. Walked around the shrine a bit, ate some udon and was on the trail at 11:00. The weather had been free of rain for a few days so the trails weren’t slick or muddy, and the temps were perfect.

Day 1 -This is my first time hiking with stuff I needed for an overnight. I was staying at the lodge but decided to save a buck or two and didn’t get the evening meal (1,600 yen). So, carried up my cook gear and food, and water, clothes, and, and, and…. Total weight was 9kg without water, probably 2kg more with water. Add to that some newly purchased hiking boots (due to my last excursion with @Half-Fast Mike ) that felt like Frankenstein shoes. I sure felt the extra weight. Would have been fine with a nice pair of trail running shoes. Will definitely trim the weight from the pack next time. Glad I didn’t decide to camp. The extra weight of the tent, bag, and mat would have been pretty tough (for me anyway). *Oh, yeah, no chances for water on the way up. Gotta carry it.

The trail is nice, no parts were difficult compared to some of the stuff I’ve hiked in the past. Only one place near the lodge where there was a chain to hold onto. Probably wasn’t needed. It is nice, flat forest trail at the start, then there are some steep parts but it gets flat again about 1 km before the lodge. I arrived at the lodge at 5:30 so it took me 6.5 hours. I was going pretty slow because I had a long day the next day and figured I needed to keep some energy in the tank.
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The lodge is nice, BTW. Looked like it was at about 25% capacity. Few rooms were occupied. Not much for privacy. As @luka said, it gets stuffy. But it was nice to get a good night’s sleep. I had a look at the camping area and it was on a narrow ridge with sharp looking gravel for a site. Didn’t look very comfortable.

Day 2 - Woke up, or more accurately, was awakened (4:00 AM, light on), cooked spam and eggs, had a cup of coffee, got on the trail at 6:30. I made a command decision not to climb up to Kumotori but rather to skirt it. My knees weren’t in great shape and I didn’t know what to expect, so took the detour. It was nice and flat for about 2km or so.
IMG_1454.jpeg . IMG_1465.jpeg . IMG_1466.jpeg

Detour 1 – The first tiling detour was the hardest. The trail disappeared and if I hadn’t had my route on my Garmin I might have lost it several times (@Half-Fast Mike …like our last outing). Plus, it is a bit of a climb. Not much, but with the overgrown trail and few markers, it is tough to follow. I spotted several of the red ribbons in the dirt.

Made it back to the main trail, which is wide, smooth and flat for long stretches. The part around Mt. Nanatsuishi required some climbing and had switchbacks but no alternative IOT get to detour #2. The downhill section before Detour #2 is not too bad.
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Detour 2 – No problem. There is a sign that said, “closed” but risked it anyway since I was only going 1km out and 1km back. Again, a flat route, no problem to follow it. Forest track, dirt. It adds about 2km to the hike but ‘hey,’ a tiler’s gotta do what a tiler’s gotta do.

With the last detour out of the way, I headed for the last stretch. The trail descends sharply until 1 or 2 km past the lodge.
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From that point on, it is really nice. Forest dirt path, gradual descent, easy to make time. Arrived at Kamosawa station at 2:00. Total elapsed time, 7.5 hours. Took the bus from Kamosawa, at Okutama for the 4:27, back home by 6:00.

Long couple days. All intended tiles bagged. Beautiful views of Fuji. What more can a guy ask for?
 

Half-Fast Mike

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Long couple days. All intended tiles bagged. Beautiful views of Fuji. What more can a guy ask for?
Great job, @Karl. And thank you for all the useful intel. Enjoy those Golden Tiles™ while they last.

I notice you didn't take a third detour, and thus left a lonely tile. I really hope it's reachable with a short scramble from the end of the Ōdawa rindō...
 
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Karl

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@Half-Fast Mike said: "I notice you didn't take a third detour, and thus left a lonely tile. I really hope it's reachable with a short scramble from the end of the Ōdawa rindō..."

I didn't see any way to get to that tile on this trip. I was looking at a cliff on my left. No way to get it. :cry:
Screen Shot 2020-10-05 at 7.30.20.png

So, in the immortal words of Arnold Schwarzenegger, "I'll be back." I'll be doing the rindo again and test the theory that 'nothing's impossible.'
 
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Half-Fast Mike

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I didn't see any way to get to that tile on this trip. I was looking at a cliff on my left. No way to get it.
Your strategy of staying at the hut sounds more sensible than mine of carrying a tent and camping.

Hmm. We discuss(t)ed this first in June then in August, of course. The warning on Yamakei in the middle of the trail says it has been closed since March 2014; lots of time to get overgrown, but judging from the position of the (X) I'm surprised that there's no evidence of the turnoff at all from the Kumotori trail. Well... I'll take a look myself when I finally manage to haul my Assos up there.

odawa.jpg

I can't be sure, but I think you were on the start of it - or maybe what use to be the start of it - near here. The 'old' trail should have started (down) from just north of the saddle.

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Ōdawa looks like a good spot for a rest.

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This sign was photographed in 2016. I wonder whether there used to be a fourth finger, pointing to Ōdawa-rindō and Nippara.

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Notes to myself, really. I know that sometimes trails really are gone, however much I want them to be there.

Even if it is there, it's a heckuva long way down, just to go straight back up again. (Around 240 m, in fact.)

Google Earth ProSnap 001.png
 
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Karl

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Argh!! I might have been able to snag that tile if I was willing to do some serious down and up. ( :eek: )

I don't remember that little jag or seeing a sign for the trail, but do remember it was a serious drop on my left. That rindo has disappeared from the maps, and I'm kinda glad I forgot about it. My knees were in enough of a mess by then but with a tile on the line, I might have been tempted.

Oh well, I have to go back up to Okutama anyway so if I can sneak past the bears again, I'll see if I can knock it out when I have a pair of fresh knees.
 
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joewein

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I waited until the end of the typhoon to head back to Hinohara, where two tiles had escaped me on Friday, September 18. They were located in the mountain range south of the road from Akiruno to Tomin no Mori, a little before where Rt33 turns off towards Uenohara via the tunnel. Last time I rode on a Friday and forestry workers were loading logs on the first road I needed to pass. At the second road a small bridge was missing. So this time I picked a Sunday (no forestry workers) and brought sneakers for easier hiking.



I turned off onto the forest road. Everywhere there was running water, from the rains of the last typhoon. After two barriers I got to the logging place, which was significantly flooded. It proved difficult to find enough solid objects to step on to avoid ankle deep water as I pushed the bike. After that I could ride a bit, but mostly I chose to push because I was too worried about the sharp edged debris on the road from fresh rock slides.



Finally I got to a stream crossing the road that I didn't want to risk crossing by bike. I changed into my sneakers, placed some rocks as stepping stones into the middle and tip-toed over.



I started a Strava recording on my phone just for the hike, and a RWGPS one as a backup. I ventured a bit further even after Google My Maps showed me inside the tile. At a small waterfall I took pictures, then turned back. I crossed the stream again, packed away my SPD shoes (I wouldn't need them until after the second hike) and descended again. Below the logging place I followed the other branch of the road, to the missing bridge, meeting this guy on the way. He was absolutely motionless.



In my sneakers I scouted out a way to cross where the bridge was missing:



The hike to the tile:



I was safely inside the second tile after I passed this landslide and puddle:



Pretty waterfalls everywhere:



I retraced the path back to the bike and descended back down to the village. From there I continued on to Tomin no Mori. On the way I collected another tile at a village to the left side of the main road.

With all planned tiles collected, I could relax and enjoy the climb and the rest of the ride, which turned out very pleasant.

2020-10-11 Hinohara tiling (+3T), Tomin no Mori-Okutama-Ome loop with some drizzle (174 km)

Hinohara Tile 1 (hiking)

Hinohara Tile 2 (hiking)

Tilers are a crazy lot :D

 
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