Flat kit

Bruno BQ

Maximum Pace
Mar 9, 2015
149
26
58
32
#1
As I am starting to bike more Kms these days I started to wonder about reliability of tube repair kits and CO2 canisters. I have a, kind old, kit to patch the tyres, and I am aiming to buy a new one and some CO2 canister, so I was wondering if you guys have any input in brand or any specific characteristic I need to be aware while browsing.

Also, I am searching for a new tube to carry around in case it can't be repaired. Any comments in brand suggestions and or characteristic to be aware?

Thanks!
 

GrantT

Maximum Pace
Oct 2, 2012
1,617
1,195
143
Setagaya
#2
I always carry at least one tube. I would rather replace the tube and just get going than spend time trying to patch a hole on the road. I also carry a repair kit though just in case I need to patch a tube. The kit includes a tube of vulcanising (or rubber) glue, patches, and a piece of sand paper. I use this glue pretty successfully, though any you get with a kit will probably do the job. However, sometimes it can be for the best to just chuck a flatted tube and buy a new one, because heat might weaken the glue, like heat you might get on a long descent, which is the worst time for a tube to suddenly go down. If you are not doing that kind of riding though, with enough practice using a repaired tube is fine.
I use Panaracer R'Air inner tubes as they are light, reliable, and not that expensive.
For slashes in the tyre itself, I always carry a couple of tyre boot (these) cut in half. They work very well.
Also, I use this pump. It is lightweight and cheap, but has been very reliable.
 
Likes: Bruno BQ

leicaman

Maximum Pace
Sep 20, 2012
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Asakadai, Saitama
#3
I always carry at least one tube. I would rather replace the tube and just get going than spend time trying to patch a hole on the road. I also carry a repair kit though just in case I need to patch a tube. The kit includes a tube of vulcanising (or rubber) glue, patches, and a piece of sand paper. I use this glue pretty successfully, though any you get with a kit will probably do the job. However, sometimes it can be for the best to just chuck a flatted tube and buy a new one, because heat might weaken the glue, like heat you might get on a long descent, which is the worst time for a tube to suddenly go down. If you are not doing that kind of riding though, with enough practice using a repaired tube is fine.
I use Panaracer R'Air inner tubes as they are light, reliable, and not that expensive.
For slashes in the tyre itself, I always carry a couple of tyre boot (these) cut in half. They work very well.
Also, I use this pump. It is lightweight and cheap, but has been very reliable.
Speaking from a lot of experience there mate ;)
 
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GrantT

Maximum Pace
Oct 2, 2012
1,617
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Setagaya
#4
Just one experience, not to be repeated. I crashed from a front flat on a long downhill after a repaired tube unrepaired itself.
 
May 22, 2007
3,608
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143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#5
I buy Schwalbe tubes, 18-28mm with a 60 mm valve stem as they will work on any of the wheel/tyre combinations I have.

JPY 884 from Amazon Japan.

I carry two spare tubes, a pump and a patch kit. I also have a bunch of patched spare tubes that I keep at home in case of a sudden pneumatic crisis.

 

Bruno BQ

Maximum Pace
Mar 9, 2015
149
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#6
Thanks for the comments and suggestions! The suggestion are exactly what I wanted so shopping time will be soon!
@GrantT I am always afraid of a flat on a down hill, I sure it won't be pleasant experience!
@Half-Fast Mike did you ever used both tube in one ride? I was wondering if I would take one or two, but getting two on the same ride seems unlikely to me

About the CO2 canister any like these canister or this kit would be ok?

Thanks again guys
 

jdd

Maximum Pace
Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
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133
Kanazawa
#7
For any older folks: I keep a 100-yen shop pair of reading glasses in my flat kit. (It helps to be able to see what you're looking at!)

Also, for rear flats when your bike is less than perfectly clean, a couple latex gloves. Tho some might prefer a small rag, which can also be used to keep your skin from freezing with the CO2 thingies.
 
Last edited:
May 22, 2007
3,608
1,440
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#8
@Half-Fast Mike did you ever used both tube in one ride? I was wondering if I would take one or two, but getting two on the same ride seems unlikely to me
It's rare but does happen. The most common type is when I hit something like a metal grating or expansion joint hard and unexpectedly at high speed and phlat both tyres at the same time. This happened to me going down the north side of Arima-tōge a while back. I have seen it happen to others, too. Another pneumotrauma day is when one of my tyres is on its last legs and doesn't really provide sufficient structural integrity; usually I knew this was going to happen but was too lazy to replace the tyre the previous evening. Finally there is the tyre sidewall slash - this can make a mess of a couple of tubes before the herniating tube is spotted.

I am not racing, so the peace of mind of extra repair options outweighs the extra space and weight.

I have never owned a CO2 cartridge thingy.
 
Aug 27, 2012
581
234
73
London, UK
www.macrophotofly.com
#9
Plus @Half-Fast Mike occasionally cycles with people who have turned up for a ride with less than the full set of bike parts...

He's the only man I know who turned up to a ride with two QR spare nuts and needed to give both out to people who managed to lose theirs from the removed wheel in Rinkos.

I have a few of those CO2 Cartridge thiungies (just one per bike) and have never actually used one yet in three years / 14,000km of cycling. One puncture for which a pump was handed to me to save wasting the cartridge (with only 5km left to the end of the ride)
 

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
2,864
1,450
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...
#10
Some kind of thin plastic sheet is good as well. Like an Australian 5$ note for example ( of course there are cheaper options). For those times you slash a sidewall on your tyre. It will stop the tube bulging out and puncturing again 30m up the road.
 

wexford

Maximum Pace
Jul 3, 2012
1,030
624
133
Tokyo
#12
I've been on 2 different rides where I needed to use 3 tubes. One tube turned out to be faulty the last time this happened. In both cases, I had to borrow a tube as I usually only have two spare with me. I now always also keep a spare tyre and tube at home in case I want to cycle the next day also and can't make it to a shop or rely on their stock.
 

Bruno BQ

Maximum Pace
Mar 9, 2015
149
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32
#13
Sounds like I will be carrying two tube then! I have never used the CO2 but seemed like a good idea as the small pump I had was quite big. On the other hand the one you suggested is tiny (and cheap)! So I am probably getting the pump. Still know more about the CO2 cartridge is always nice.

Thanks for all the suggestion! I will order the stuff so I ride less worried.
 

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
2,864
1,450
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#14
This is my kit

2xCO2 canisters
CO2 attachment
Small patch kit
1 new (Or repaired and checked) inner tube
small plastic sheet
valve unscrewing tool
spare valve x 2
valve extender
3x tyre levers
mid sized multi tool

(It all fits into a small bag under the seat for Summer, when two water bottles are required, or into a plastic bottle in spring, fall, and winter when only one bottle is required)