Electric DURA-ACE "Di2" will come in next spring

Sora

Basho's companion
Nov 2, 2005
933
46
58
117
Yokohama -> Fukuoka
www.e-wadachi.com
#1

thomas

The Crank Engine
Nov 1, 2005
1,799
203
93
多摩区
#2
While I'm not opposed to innovation, I do like the mechanical aspects of cycling. What's next? An electrical engine to facilitate hillclimbs?

What I also don't like about the 7900 series in general:

- carbon pulley plates on the rear derailleur
- carbon brake levers
- don't know what material it is, but the black parts of the calipers and rear derailleurs

What I like:

- titanium components on the dual control levers and the brakes
- the new range of rear cassette sprockets, in particular 11-27T and 11-28T (not that I need them *cough, cough*) :warau:

Does anyone know what happened to their FC-7800C carbon crankset? Has it been released yet?
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,630
447
103
Japan
#3
While I'm not opposed to innovation, I do like the mechanical aspects of cycling. What's next? An electrical engine to facilitate hillclimbs?
Yamaha pas et al.

Mavic tried a similar thing about 1993 or so. Worked but extra weight so it flopped. Can't see the point if you still need cables to pull the brakes, surely the batteries weigh more than two cables going to the FD and RD? Thus more expensive light parts and like Thomas said, all those carbon bits? Seems like this was probably driven by the marketers and not the engineers but I am sure it will catch on as Shimano sponsors a large number of pros who will be copied by the groupies and fans.
 

AlanW

Maximum Pace
Jan 30, 2007
1,214
434
103
Tokyo
#4
Shimano have been testing this on professional bikes for quite a while now, and I think the production version looks very nice. They claim it's within a few grammes of the new mechanical Dura-Ace (7900 series), and actually lighter than the current 7800-series. The weight of the battery and servo-motors is offset by not having the complicated ratchet mechanism of the shifters, plus the electronic cables are a bit lighter than a traditional Bowden cable.
Do we actually need electronic shifting? Of course not......but......do we actually need indexed gears, combined brake and shift levers, dual pivot brakes etc etc? All of these innovations are now taken for granted.
If electronic shifting works markedly better than mechanical systems I can see it taking off. It's got a couple of nice features built in - I like the automatic tuning of the system and the ability to mount remote shifter buttons. There are also possibilities to change the feel of the shift to something very snappy indeed, as the shift lever only needs to close an electric contact. I like that the mechanical option is available too so we are not forced to go the electronic route.

The really great thing is that the 3 groupset manufacturers are really pushing each other at present - Shimano with this electronic system, Sram with their ultra-light Red group and Campagnolo with their 11-speed Super Record. More shiny bits for us!
 

4candles

Warming-Up
Feb 1, 2008
4
0
0
Hitchin U.K.
#5
While I'm not opposed to innovation, I do like the mechanical aspects of cycling. What's next? An electrical engine to facilitate hillclimbs?

What I also don't like about the 7900 series in general:

- carbon pulley plates on the rear derailleur
- carbon brake levers
- don't know what material it is, but the black parts of the calipers and rear derailleurs

What I like:

- titanium components on the dual control levers and the brakes
- the new range of rear cassette sprockets, in particular 11-27T and 11-28T (not that I need them *cough, cough*) :warau:

Does anyone know what happened to their FC-7800C carbon crankset? Has it been released yet?
Well i like it all... they're so far out front with technology and it lasts ages, i still have a bike with Dura Ace 7400 on and it all still works fine.:D
 

chazzer

Speeding Up
Nov 23, 2006
449
0
36
Bushey Heath, Hertfordshire
#6
11 speed

Dura-Ace would be my next upgrade when it comes. On 10 speed Ultegra now, and it is of course pure vanity, but the Dura-Ace logo has to be had !

I have Dura-Ace pedals and chain, maybe a cassette too, but need the full rig really. Oh .....yes ...the brakes too !

Actually 11 speed would be great for a slow climber like me using a compact. If find 34/27 is all I really need but occasionally run out of gears going downhill so so an 11/28 would be great rather than the current 12/27.

chazzer
 

Phil

Maximum Pace
#7
chazzer, I'm not sure, but I think SRAM already make a 10-speed 11-28 cassette (Shimano compatible)...

As for the electronic stuff, I'm not so sure. I can see the advantages (more than, say, the Campy 11-speed stuff) but like Thomas I like the fact that bikes are 100% mechanical (except for our blinkies and Garmins/Polars/Cateyes etc). Not many machines are these days.