drop bars--suggestions/recommendations?

jdd

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#1
Since it's a rainy day...

I'm looking for some new bars, comfortable on top but comfort is especially important on the drops. Preference for something on the wide side, and possibly with less than normal drop (tho I'd choose comfort over that). Carbon or alloy--cost is a factor but not that much a one. I've seen some bars where the drop part is wider than the top, the drop part is flared out a little. Any sense to that design?

Suggestions?

(Also, I can't remember bars being discussed here. If someone can link to that, great.)
 

AlanW

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#3
FSA make shallow drops that many people seem to find very comfortable. Probably more expensive than Tim's suggestion though.
 
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#4
I think the FSA Wing Pro compact is exactly what you describe. I love them. Can't recommend them enough, especially if you actually ride in your drops for long periods. They look "mini" but it aids in a comfortable riding position. I also ride the Easton EC90 equippe SL, another compact bar but have found the FSA Wing Pro compact the most comfortable of all. It does flare out a little on the sides, making the actual distance where the hoods are approximately 2cm closer on the 44 (making the hoods 42 center to center). This is nice so if you bunny hop when in the drops your wrists don't smack the t-bar. The Deda RHM 2 is a somewhat compact bar I also ride but approximately 3cm deeper than the FSA. You wouldnt think that is much but for me it is a difference between bliss and back pain. Also keep in mind if going Deda they measure outside to outside. The T-bar on the FSA is also oval in the shape so that your hands have a nice place to rest and have cable indentations on the bottom.
 

jdd

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#5
Stopped at two local shops on the way back from the pool, and one had both the FSA compact pro and also various Deda bars. The other shop had one I liked--Ergonova Pro (or was it ergonova 3T?), the drop position felt best. A slight curve in the drop position, but no pronounced bend to wonder about how comfortable that would be. (The FSAs were a close second to these.)

There was another I couldn't make out the name on (didn't have my reading glasses), and the shop was really busy so I didn't ask. It was something like "Vibe.." or "Vibc.." with a stylized number 7 and maybe a "t" in the end of the name. Similar to the very lightly curved ergonovas on the drop (a tab shorter reach?). Not a broad/flat top, but a large diameter tube on top which I think would yield some comfort.

One set (one of the Dedas?) was odd in that the top felt fine, but in the drop the tube thinned out before going back to std diameter at the end. Too skinny, more meat to grab would be better.

Neither shop had Nitto rando or noodle. There's another shop or two to check on, maybe an off chance one might have them. This is something I'd really like to touch, grip and hold before buying.

Thanks for the ideas.

John D.
 

GSAstuto

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#7
The bars that work the best are the ones YOU like. I pay little attention to reviews on these things. Also not sure why everyone is going to super shallow drops these days. Maybe they can't get their nose on the rivet anymore. To me, the whole purpose of drop bars is to give me the most powerful riding position IN THE DROPS, then use the top side for the uphill mashes, eating or recovery. If a rider spends more time on the tops of the bars than the drops, then either they are fitted wrong entirely, out of shape, or using the wrong bar for the job (drop bars vs. noodles, randos, scorchers or straights)

With that being said - I'm also a fairly big fan of the Deda RHM-02. And for 2900 yen, you can't beat the price with anything else! My favorite bars are Cinelli 65-42 Criteriums, and I'll be so happy to be riding them again next month!
 

FarEast

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#8
Agree with what Tim said - Bars and Bar fitting are very important. I've used tons of different bar and stem setups and each one is unique - Make sure you get the correct width first off but ergonomics is the key here - what someone else might find bliss to ride others find uncomfortable.

I personally like wide tops as I don't normally cruise in the hoods - and I like deeper drops as I use the inside of my wrist to aplly preasure to the bar when sprinting, others don't like contact on the arm in the drops so each person is unique..... best bet, get the pair you like in your hands and see how they actually feel.
 

jdd

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#9
Note that I picked the ergonovas out of a pile on my own when nobody had mentioned them (and the vibe7 set, too), and found the review in the aftermath.

Touch and feel--yes, extremely important. (but getting some ideas here to start was good!)

I'm considering bars for two bikes--replacing the stock ones on my trek (crap down low), and new on my new frame (light touring). Different purposes and fittings on each. I appreciate the above reviewer pointing out that for the oversized Vibe7 bars, barcons, still an option for my touring setup, may not fit quite right. That's not something I would have thought of on my own.
 

fredstaple

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#10
Ergonova

I ride the carbom version of the Ergonova by 3T (not the Limited). I came to this bar after having the FSA K-wing. Where the K-wing is flatter on top, the Ergonova is more oval which I find very comfortable. I ride the top of the bar a lot and like this feature.

In the drops it is comfortable, but not the stiffest one. Find the bar that feels good to you as others have said, however, if this one feels right, I don't think you will be disappointed. It is expensive.
 

Desune

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#11
I also ride a carbon 3T Ergonova; no issues for me either. I really like the tops and they're quite nice looking too...but as people have been pointing out, everyone is different so YMMV.
 

Sikochi

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#13
Note that I picked the ergonovas out of a pile on my own when nobody had mentioned them (and the vibe7 set, too), and found the review in the aftermath.
Having small hands, the 3T Ergonova`s are what I have planned to replace my handlebars in due course (when I can sneak it past the missus!) I have FSA Omega which is also compact, but seem just a tad harsh to me. As I like posting links;-
http://stevefleck.blogspot.com/2009/11/new-bars-3t-ergonova-team.html
Will it be aluminium or carbon...
 

jdd

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#14
I was looking at the alloy version of the ergonova at ¥11,000 (their list, which will drop some). There were a couple of carbon bars that I looked at which they said the same design was available in alloy. I think it'll take a few more shop visits (with more googling) to really decide.

From my initial post you can probably sense that I'm a total noob on bars. And since it just snowed more today :( maybe I'll try to learn a little more before deciding.
 

FarEast

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#15
The alloy will be lighter although not as stiff - if you are using a carbon stem then I would go with the alloy bars - if the bike is alloy then I would suggest getting a carbon stem and alloy bar and the other way around if you are riding carbon frame.

It's about reducing road vibration and shock - just because its carbon doesn't make it lightwer or better - it's a tool that has properties that you need to think about before selecting.
 

Yamabushi

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#16
...just because its carbon doesn't make it lighter or better...
Words I never thought I would hear you utter! :eek:

Seriously though... as for the stiffer/lighter, carbon/aluminum issue as it relates to stems and bars (more bars than stems)... I slightly disagree with FE. There is no absolute here. It's case by case depending on the manufacturer and the specific bars that we're talking about.
 

jdd

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#18
I am surprised Tim (GS Astuto) hasn't offered his selection of carbon bars. I fit two people and used them and they love them.
For one of my bikes, the new one, I think Tim has a good idea of what I'm going for, I think why he suggested the nitto bars. It's steel, touring geometry, I think alloy bars would be fine. (Also, I want to go touchy-feelie rather than mail order.)

But you (and Pete) have confused me about frame/stem/bars combinations. The Trek is CF, so according to your above comment, it should have an alloy stem and CF bars...? (which Pete then disagreed with!) Again, showing the noob thing, I hadn't realized such pairings were commonly offered, accepted, or argued about.
 

FarEast

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#19
Words I never thought I would hear you utter! :eek:

Seriously though... as for the stiffer/lighter, carbon/aluminum issue as it relates to stems and bars (more bars than stems)... I slightly disagree with FE. There is no absolute here. It's case by case depending on the manufacturer and the specific bars that we're talking about.
Lol - actually for the past 3 years I've only used Alu bar and stem on my bikes that I use for racing - I need something that can take the stresses that I put through the bars in a sprint as I tend to be very heavy handed. I took a gamble with the Deda 35's as they come as a carbon bar and Alu stem and I love the combo, although all the other Pinarello's have a full carbon intergrated bar and stem with alloy core - again great set up but I feel a little too flexy when getting rough.

agree with what you say that there is no real absolute however after riding numerous amounts of stems and bars I've found that in general its true.

Also when it comes to carbon parts I strongly suggest you look at the specs as alot of the stuff is normally alu with a carbon wrap - basically a cosmetic finish.
 

Yamabushi

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#20
Lol - actually for the past 3 years I've only used Alu bar and stem on my bikes that I use for racing - I need something that can take the stresses that I put through the bars in a sprint as I tend to be very heavy handed. I took a gamble with the Deda 35's as they come as a carbon bar and Alu stem and I love the combo, although all the other Pinarello's have a full carbon intergrated bar and stem with alloy core - again great set up but I feel a little too flexy when getting rough.

agree with what you say that there is no real absolute however after riding numerous amounts of stems and bars I've found that in general its true.

Also when it comes to carbon parts I strongly suggest you look at the specs as alot of the stuff is normally alu with a carbon wrap - basically a cosmetic finish.
Agreed! :thumb:

BTW... LOL... I know you are fare-minded and not actually the carbon whore you portray yourself as! :)