Today Dec 2018

Sikochi

Maximum Pace
Sep 13, 2010
1,185
79
68
Kochi
#41
Your energy intake needs to be lower than the energy expended, doh! — and it doesn't matter much what food group you get the calories from.
On this subject, will just add this recent research. Full article here

But a large new study published on Wednesday in the journal BMJ challenges the conventional wisdom. It found that overweight adults who cut carbohydrates from their diets and replaced them with fat sharply increased their metabolisms. After five months on the diet, their bodies burned roughly 250 calories more per day than people who ate a high-carb, low-fat diet, suggesting that restricting carb intake could help people maintain their weight loss more easily.

The new research is unlikely to end the decades-long debate over the best diet for weight loss. But it provides strong new evidence that all calories are not metabolically alike to the body. And it suggests that the popular advice on weight loss promoted by health authorities — count calories, reduce portion sizes and lower your fat intake — might be outdated.
 

Sikochi

Maximum Pace
Sep 13, 2010
1,185
79
68
Kochi
#42
I'm running a clincher/tube set up with vinyl tape. I can't help wondering if a little bit of the rubber from the tyre had melted during the summer months and stuck the tyre to the bead seat. It seems unlikely, but who knows. I got pretty frustrated, but not frustrated enough to do something as dumb as this guy
Are you using the standard 5000 or the tubeless version? Given the better test scores the 5000 have achieved over the 4000S2, I will be switching to these when replacement tyre tyme comes around.
 

stu_kawagoe

Maximum Pace
Jun 23, 2018
360
330
83
#43
Just been looking at a review of the Dura Ace Di2 and Red Etap. I had no idea the Etap was wireless. It does seem like the future. It makes me wonder how long before mechanical shifting is totally superseded.

Anyway, just a short ride with my daughter today. Nothing tomorrow (err, today) as I’ve got work, though I’m free Monday if anyone fancies a run out. I’ll probably default to the Green Line or similar if I go out solo.

Enjoy the rest of the weekend😉
 
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Justin

Speeding Up
Nov 12, 2016
42
42
28
37
#44
Are you using the standard 5000 or the tubeless version? Given the better test scores the 5000 have achieved over the 4000S2, I will be switching to these when replacement tyre tyme comes around.
I have the standard version, 23 up front and 25 in the back (I’ll get on the wide tyre trend eventually — give me a few more years). I took them out for a quick ride today and was really impressed. I couldn’t discern much difference in cornering, but I did feel that the ride was a fair bit smoother and more comfortable than my experience on the 4000S II. Whether that really was the tyres or just my imagination, I couldn’t tell you for sure.
 

bloaker

Maximum Pace
Nov 14, 2011
1,805
1,762
433
Miura, Japan
#45
Broke out the commuter tonight and went for a ride along the beach to Enoshima and back. Didn't even dress for it. Hopped on the bike wearing exactly what I wore most the day. Only cycling specific gear I had one was gloves and a helmet. End result was an enjoyable, but chilly ride.


20181209_214646.jpg

I found a tunnel to a cemetery. The art was nice, so I snapped some pics.
20181209_215938.jpg 20181209_220115.jpg 20181209_220154.jpg 20181209_220243.jpg 20181209_220251.jpg
 

Attachments

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
556
285
93
42
#46
@Sikochi
Thanks for the link, learnt something. So you really need to know what you optimize for (e. g. overall health, sports or weight loss).

@stu_kawagoe
I think mechanical shifting will stay with us for the foreseeable future, just for price reasons. And while eTap seems to be really easy to set up, storing the battery for Shimano's Di2 groupsets seems to be a bit of a pain, one that may not be offset by the slightly faster shift times.

I can see Shimano removing mechanical Durace from its line-up in two generations, perhaps, but not necessarily with the next one. With Ultegra Di2, I think all Shimano will do is make it cheaper. And I don't expect them to offer a Di2 version of their 105 groupset.

Usually Shimano is very (way too) conservative when it comes to technologies. (Just have a look how long it takes them to finally accept 1x. They have been asleep at the wheel, especially in the MTB realm, and while SRAM has 1x offerings from SRAM's Deore SLX-equivalent groupset to its XTR-equivalent. And its Ultegra RX-derailleurs officially top at at measly 34-tooth cassettes.)

SRAM will definitely push the envelope much further. I would expect an electronic rear derailleur with clutch mechanism next, and perhaps a Force 1 variant.
 
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stu_kawagoe

Maximum Pace
Jun 23, 2018
360
330
83
#47
I made it out again today. I rode up the Green Line rindos from Moroyama to the 818 spot (I can’t actually read the name of that toge). I then descended onto the 299 from there. The descent was pretty fast and safe so I enjoyed that. I also came out at the Shomaru tunnel, which was a bit of a surprise. Good to know, as next time I’d like to extend the ride over Shomaru Toge and into Hanno proper.

I went for two pairs of socks and two hokairos in each shoe for today’s ride. This worked great until it didn’t. I maybe got three hours of toasty feet. Kind of frustrating because the packet promised nine hours. It might be time to buy some shoe covers.

My total distance today was about 85km with 1,500m of elevation.

The Strava is here.

@OreoCookie - yeah, it does seem shimano are less innovative than SRAM. I was kind of blown away when I read how simple the Etap were to install.
 
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joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,507
1,067
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#49

Justin

Speeding Up
Nov 12, 2016
42
42
28
37
#50
I made it out again today. I rode up the Green Line rindos from Moroyama to the 818 spot (I can’t actually read the name of that toge). I then descended onto the 299 from there. The descent was pretty fast and safe so I enjoyed that. I also came out at the Shomaru tunnel, which was a bit of a surprise. Good to know, as next time I’d like to extend the ride over Shomaru Toge and into Hanno proper.

I went for two pairs of socks and two hokairos in each shoe for today’s ride. This worked great until it didn’t. I maybe got three hours of toasty feet. Kind of frustrating because the packet promised nine hours. It might be time to buy some shoe covers.

My total distance today was about 85km with 1,500m of elevation.

The Strava is here.

@OreoCookie - yeah, it does seem shimano are less innovative than SRAM. I was kind of blown away when I read how simple the Etap were to install.
My booties died last week and I didn’t have a chance to get a replacement pair before my Sunday ride, so I double-socked and stuffed two hokkairo in each shoe. My toes were fine for two hours, but after that they started to feel the chill. I stopped at a combini and pulled the hokkairo out. Cold.

Time to spend yet more money on cycling kit.
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,507
1,067
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#51


I headed to Izu on Saturday. A year ago I had also done a west Izu ride in December, with a cyclist from the US who I met online. The route was similar.

My friend Ikuyo will be leaving Japan next month, so we organised a farewell ride for her. It was going to be from Mishima to Shimoda, about 110 km. I had to head back up to Mishima because I took the car to the start, not a train like everybody else. I am in the second week of a cold and had been coughing my lung out, but still went on the ride. I figured, if I was feeling worse I could always turn around, but if I didn't go I would forever regret it.

The views were spectacular. Now Ikuyo regrets she didn't ride in Izu sooner :)

We had three punctures, all on the same bike (not mine). We also had a sit down sea food lunch in Toi, 60 km into the ride.

It was cold, but not quite as chilly as I had expected. I brought slightly more layers than I needed, but that's better than the opposite. It really only got cold after sunset. Speaking of which, less than an hour before sunset we got close to Matsuzaki and we bid each other farewell. While everyone else turned inland, towards Shimoda, I headed further down the coast to Iwachi Onsen and then to Kumomi port.

Throughout the day the wind had been getting stronger and stronger. Towards sunset it was so fierce, I was almost blown off the road. Matsuzaki to Kumomi is my favourite part of the coast. In Kumomi there is one towering rock, Mount Eboshi (162 m), with a shrine at its foot and another at the top. I had always wanted to climb that.

I parked the bike at the bottom of the steps leading up the mountain, running up as quickly as I could with 90 km already in my legs, in my SPD shoes. The steps ended and I continued up a hiking path, rushing against the fading daylight. At the very top, side by side with the shrine, was a viewing platform made of concrete with handrails that gives you a 360 degree panorama of the entire coastline, with Fuji to the north and the wild cliffs without any road to the south. It was like viewing it from an airplane, especially with the fierce wind.





Finally I descended again. I knew I had 80 km in the dark ahead of me, first up to Toi, then 8 km up the mountains away from the coast, then a descent towards Shuzenji in the center. I only arrived back at Mishima at 23:30.

The total distance came to 173 km with 2295 m of elevation gain. This completes my century for December, my 76th consecutive month with at least one 100 mile ride.
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
556
285
93
42
#52
@OreoCookie - yeah, it does seem shimano are less innovative than SRAM. I was kind of blown away when I read how simple the Etap were to install.
I have really liked my Shimano MTB group sets so far, my XT has been nothing but reliable. The brakes are great and the operation of the shifters has notably improved with each generation I have used. But somehow I really dislike Shimano's STI levers, including their Di2 brethren. Especially in winter I have lots of misshifts (as in no-shifts), and the very idea to mix a brake and a shift lever in one seems stupid.

The SRAM Force 1 shifters I have tried on the other hand seemed like heaven: crisp, positive shift action, from second 0, I “got” their dual action lever and I also liked the hood shape. Too bad that you have a hard time finding bikes in Japan that do not use Shimano group sets.
My booties died last week and I didn’t have a chance to get a replacement pair before my Sunday ride, so I double-socked and stuffed two hokkairo in each shoe. My toes were fine for two hours, but after that they started to feel the chill. I stopped at a combini and pulled the hokkairo out. Cold.
Put your feet (with socks) in plastic bags, that does the trick for me — and I am prone to having cold feet. (I always keep two in my saddle bag, just in case.)
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,507
1,067
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#53
My booties died last week and I didn’t have a chance to get a replacement pair before my Sunday ride, so I double-socked and stuffed two hokkairo in each shoe.
This will be my 8th winter of cycling, but I have yet to use hokkairo.

I use "Belgian shoe covers", i.e. a pair of old socks worn over the shoes, with some strategically placed scissor cuts to provide access for the SPD cleats. Some airlines provide a convenient kit including over-socks to wear instead of shoes on the plane, which also do the job and are free. Basically anything that will keep the airflow away from the outside of the shoes will help your feet maintain their temperature. Plastic bags will work too, but you're more likely to sweat in them because they also act as a moisture barrier.
 

Justin

Speeding Up
Nov 12, 2016
42
42
28
37
#54
I always assumed that old socks would get holes in no time and therefore require constant replacements, although I suppose that’s not a problem if you have a lot of old socks.
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
556
285
93
42
#55
@joewein
Those are some beautiful shots, I can only imagine what the scenery was like in reality.

Plastic bags will work too, but you're more likely to sweat in them because they also act as a moisture barrier.
That's one of the reasons why they keep you warm, but I think old socks are a really bad way to do that because they are not wind proof. I have wind proof overshoes made of GoreTeX and they make a world of difference as long as it is not superwet and they get soaked. I would expect that old socks are quite useless once you get moving.

I do the same with gloves btw, I keep a pair of latex gloves in my saddle bag (which have other uses, too, e. g. when you need to fix an oily chain or tend to an injured rider), and that works wonders, too. Plus, your shoes and gloves will smell fresh also after the ride ;)

I'm sure there are “better” ways, but I found this solution to be cheap and add pretty much no weight or bulk. If my feet or hands get too warm, I can always take them off.
 
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joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,507
1,067
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#57
@joeweinI think old socks are a really bad way to do that because they are not wind proof. I have wind proof overshoes made of GoreTeX and they make a world of difference as long as it is not superwet and they get soaked. I would expect that old socks are quite useless once you get moving.
You'd be surprised! Off course a wind-stopping material will work best, but ordinary thin cotton will make a surprising difference when worn on top of the shoes. The old socks don't have to keep all of the cold air away from the shoes, they just have to deflect most of the cold air flow 1-2 mm away from them. It's simply aerodynamics: far more air will flow around the sock than will seep through the fibers. The resulting reduction in heat flow will be similar to the difference from wearing an extra base layer under your jersey.

I would not recommend the old sock method for a cold and wet ride and they certainly won't win any beauty contests. The socks won't keep you dry but on a cold and dry day they're just fine.

Yes, they will fall apart fairly soon but one or two pairs will get me through a winter, unlike hokkairo, which will need replacing constantly.
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
556
285
93
42
#58
@joewein
While I understand your explanation, are you sure that this is what actually happens in practice? I have a warm jacket (from Pearl Izumi) that will become pretty much “transparent” when riding and keeps me toasty when I stop. For transitional days it is pretty much perfect, and I can also wear it underneath something wind proof to keep me warm once it gets really cold. I thought a pair socks would act in much the same way. I realize that the area exposed to the wind is smaller, it is just the tip of the shoe, but I am still skeptical that it is very effective.
 

stu_kawagoe

Maximum Pace
Jun 23, 2018
360
330
83
#59
Last day of work for me today!

@joewein I haven't tried the plastic bags yet, only wrapping my feet in clingfilm (not totally sure of its effectiveness). The bags might be better though because, as you said, you can stuff them in your pocket to be used as needed.

@OreoCookie I like the idea of the latex gloves too. I've been using them when I work on my bike but haven't tried them while riding. The problem I've been having with my gloves at the moment is that I sweat and then my hands get cold on the descents. I was thinking about getting a second set to take with me on long rides but maybe the gloves aren't good enough. They were a birthday present my mum sent me and I don't have anything to compare them to as they are my first winter pair.

I'm back to the UK at the weekend, so I'm going to try and get in a couple more rides before I go. I've looked into renting a bike when I'm over there, but so far all I've been able to find are hybrids.
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,507
1,067
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#60
@joewein
While I understand your explanation, are you sure that this is what actually happens in practice? I have a warm jacket (from Pearl Izumi) that will become pretty much “transparent” when riding and keeps me toasty when I stop.
The secret to cold weather exercise is layering. You don't have to have perfect wind-stopping textiles for an extra layer to make a difference.

For example, I have a pair of 980 yen knit gloves that I wear for cycling. They are definitely not some kind of wind-stopping material, yet on their own they are comfortable as long as it's at least 5-6 C around here. Compared to riding bare-handed, they will probably reduce the amount of heat loss from the hands by at least an order of magnitude. There will be some air flow in between the threads of the knit material, but it will be much lower in volume and at lower speed than the kind of air flow that would hit my bare hands.

I do have some wind-stopping winter cycling gloves too, but guess what? I sweat more in them and once they're moist, they feel freezing cold, while the non-wind stopping knit gloves never get too sweaty and remain comfortable.

I wouldn't advocate riding in the winter wearing just a pair of socks on otherwise bare feet, but a pair of socks worn on top of a pair of shoes worn on top of a pair of socks adds a significant degree of insulation, enough to be able to ride at colder temperatures with the same level of comfort.