Cyclist`s Licence for school students

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#2
Nice - but the article below that is most disturbing ..

"... On April 20, the assistant teacher's car hit the boy as he was crossing an intersection near the school.
After realizing the boy was lying on the road, the teacher fled the scene "out of fear of losing his job," the board of education said.."


There was an article a few days ago in the Japan Times about:-
`An Aichi high school has launched a "cyclist's license" that it is crediting with eliminating traffic accidents involving its students.`
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20120511b6.html
 
May 22, 2007
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#4
they need laws for cyclists and more laws for mama chari riders...

Cyclists aren't the problem....
I think they are, in many cases. Twice this morning I almost creamed cyclists who were riding very dangerously. The first one went straight through a junction on red - I had right of way and it was only because I'd slowed down to turn left on the wet and manhole-ridden road that I didn't wipe her out. The second made to cross a crossing a full ten seconds before the light changed. Any one of ten vehicles including me could have hit him. (Of course he had an umbrella in one hand, his mobile phone in the other, and a cigarette in the other.)

While it's good to see the kamikaze spirit alive (!) and well in Japan, I wish they would not drag other road users into their suicide attempts.
 
May 22, 2007
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#5
Brits of a certain age will remember the Cycling Proficiency Test - a national programme administered and quality-controlled by RoSPA (the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents).

Note that there is no equivalent national safety organization in Japan, probably because it would impinge on the well-established amakudari channels for the police and other vested interests.

The current scheme in England and Wales is called Bikeability and is run by the Department for Transport.

Would we (I speak as a member of the British Government) be delighted to help the Japanese authorities on a fact-finding mission? Absolutely. Will they ask? No way.

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This is an interesting paper, although quite old now: Road safety in Japan
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,443
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Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#6
While it's good to see the kamikaze spirit alive (!) and well in Japan, I wish they would not drag other road users into their suicide attempts.
As a historical note, I believe dragging others into their suicide attempts was exactly what the original kamikaze spirit was about!

(Ooops, I've mentioned the war, but I think I got away with it!)


My favourite recently are cyclists directly coming towards me on the wrong side of the road, forcing me to move out further into the road to avoid them. I have taken to shouting "hantai gawa!" (opposite side!) at every one of them.
 

bird

Speeding Up
Nov 30, 2010
322
18
38
Kawasaki
#8
Personally, I'd welcome if a licence became mandated for cycling in the public, as long as violation of rules such as "hantai gawa" is met with reasonable penalty.
However, these rules and penalties have existed for a long time in the law, yet the police doesn't seem to have the will or competence to enforce them, except the recent crackdown which is at best sporadic or arbitrary targeted...
 

Wolfman

Speeding Up
Jul 31, 2007
631
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38
Suginamiku
#9
I mean wow, what a revolutionary idea. An actual certificate or proper training on how to use a bike.
It's not like the rest of the world has been doing this for 40 or 50 years.

Just proves that time travel does actually exist - you can get on a plane and go back 20 or 30 years in time just by visiting Japan:cool:.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
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103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#12
I've often said that being in Japan is nearest to playing Dr. Who as possible. And a chance to actually capitalize on missed opportunities as nothing happens here that has not already occured at least 10+ years ago elsewhere.

I know they do teach some cycling skills in elementary school - but not early enough! My daughter is already riding bike, along with many of her classmates, and it's not until several years later they will receive any formal training.

The key problem here is that Japan corrupted its own cycling culture by forcing the bikes off the road to begin with and on to the sidewalks in deference of the almightly automobile. Much the same China is doing now, and similar to what happened in UK, Europe and US in the post-industrial age.

So, now they are faced with how to restructure the system back into a cycling integrated society. And with minimal statutes governing the operations of those vehicles to begin with, creating licensing programs is putting the cart before the horse. What they should be focusing on is re-legislation and unification of the vehicle statutes and laws regarding bicycles (not just rickshaws) and improvement and expansion of cycle friendly paths and roadways (like every other major, 1st world country does). THEN start looking at licenses.

Finally the Japanese population is looking again at cycling not only as a gambling 'sport' , or shopping utensile, but as a viable and sustainable transportation device. Let's hope they examine how other cities and countried have successfully integrated cycles into their master transportation plan and apply some of that here.

I mean wow, what a revolutionary idea. An actual certificate or proper training on how to use a bike.
It's not like the rest of the world has been doing this for 40 or 50 years.

Just proves that time travel does actually exist - you can get on a plane and go back 20 or 30 years in time just by visiting Japan:cool:.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#14
Not sure now - but , we had bicycle safety classes as part of P.E. (Physical Education) and there were lots of films shown in class regarding safety in general (including bicycles). Plus, just about every other kid I knew was member of the Cub Scouts or Boy Scouts and Cycling was one of the merit badges.

In addition - on the motor vehicle side, the laws were quite clear. Treat bikes as if they are any other motor vehicle. And bikes are required by law to follow the rules of the road same as any other vehicle. With only a few exceptions.

We'll never have a perfect co-existence between such dissimilar vehicles occupying the same roadway - but eduction, road planning and general awareness will definitely improve things. The main point I see in Japan is just a lack of consistent roadway laws regarding bicycles. And some of the laws in place don't make sense when you apply to faster moving cyclists sharing the road with cars (like, it's OK to travel the 'wrong way' on a one way street) And the silly 'J HOOK' Turn to go right at a light. Etc etc.

Most US schools do not have any type of bike education program but the League of American Bicyclists has some excellent materials and programs: http://www.bikeleague.org/programs/education/
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
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103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#16
Now you see why we never forgot? Edward Horton - perfect choice. For ANY 5yo then, his voice was unmistakable thanks to Fractured Fairytales. With safety films like this, Outer Limits , weekly bomb drills and neighbors building fallout shelters in their backyard, you can see how an entire generation got completely warped.

a US cycling safety film from 1963.

http://www.archive.org/details/OneGotFa1963

The reviews/comments are quite interesting too.
 

snoogly

Maximum Pace
Oct 14, 2007
695
48
48
Machida, Tokyo
#17
I remember as an 8 year old being sent home from the first day of training for the Cycling Proficiency Test because my bike wasn't up to scratch. Bars higher than my head, with 10 inch plastic strips hanging off the ends; massive banana 'saddle'; and a steel back rest that wouldn't have looked out of place in 'Easy Rider'. I got the sulks, and never went back. To this day I still call it the Cycling Deficiency Test. ;-)

Brits of a certain age will remember the Cycling Proficiency Test - a national programme administered and quality-controlled by RoSPA (the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents).

Note that there is no equivalent national safety organization in Japan, probably because it would impinge on the well-established amakudari channels for the police and other vested interests.

The current scheme in England and Wales is called Bikeability and is run by the Department for Transport.

Would we (I speak as a member of the British Government) be delighted to help the Japanese authorities on a fact-finding mission? Absolutely. Will they ask? No way.

proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fs3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com%2Flowres-picturecabinet.com%2F186%2Fmain%2F1%2F825546.jpg&hash=8ad108228656803a69f4e87a5faf06b4


This is an interesting paper, although quite old now: Road safety in Japan
 

Wolfman

Speeding Up
Jul 31, 2007
631
18
38
Suginamiku
#19
You mean a beast like this? Yes, I also remember the 1970s. These chopper bicycles ...
This thread could almost turn into a retrospective on our childhood bikes and their inadequacies.... but I won't hijack the thread with that type of thing.

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The Raleigh Grifter. Loved the chunky tires. Always regret not getting a chopper (simply because of the style) - my best friend had one at the time. I could beat him in any race.
 

Desune

Speeding Up
May 7, 2008
64
0
26
Tokyo
#20
You mean a beast like this? Yes, I also remember the 1970s. These chopper bicycles were supposed to look cool, but really they weren't much fun to ride. Too heavy, too uncomfortable, not something you would really ride very far on.
When you're only 10, you don't really go that far anyway. The banana seat meant you could give your buddy a ride. It's not complete without the tassels though.