Cycling Routes/Paths in Tokyo

Warren

Warming-Up
Sep 5, 2006
8
0
0
Tokyo
#1
Hello all,

My bike was finally delivered from Canada. I tuned it up and took it for a 50k ride yesterday, but I was stumped by the number of traffic lights I kept hitting. Are there any good, long cycling paths in Tokyo? Or any good roads that don't have too many lights? I suspect not for the latter, but any advice would be appreciated.

Warren
 
Nov 9, 2006
303
0
36
Yokohama
#2
Urban Japan

Hello all,

My bike was finally delivered from Canada. I tuned it up and took it for a 50k ride yesterday, but I was stumped by the number of traffic lights I kept hitting. Are there any good, long cycling paths in Tokyo? Or any good roads that don't have too many lights? I suspect not for the latter, but any advice would be appreciated.

Warren
Any large Japanese city will have vast numbers of intersections, and, subsequently, vast numbers of stop lights. Yokohama is much the same.
 

Pete

Speeding Up
Sep 22, 2006
144
1
38
Ichikawa Chiba
#3
Hi Warren

Glad your bike arrived safely:)

Umm in Tokyo it can be difficult to find areas to open up your bike on the roads.

If you want to have a quiet and peaceful ride, try the Edogawa cycle path. It runs on a loop around the river. About 120km in total. The further you go the more peaceful it is. And fairly scenic as well. Its great for relaxing with a MP3 player. There are also some shops for buying food and drink ect. But don't try on a windy day. It's like hitting a wall of wind.

I think this is one of the many good paths in or around Tokyo.
 

WhiteGiant

Maximum Pace
Nov 4, 2006
1,192
240
93
Kita-Ueno
#4
River-side cycling roads.

Hello Warren,
This is Travis.
Riding in Tokyo really depends on where you live, but for uninterrupted riding on flat ground with no traffic lights, you have to hit the rivers.
The main ones are:
Arakawa.
Tamagawa.
and Edogawa.

My personal preference is Arakawa; It's wide, and it goes up for at least 70km/40miles. However, as Pete has already mentioned, the wind can be really nasty - depending on when (in which season) you ride.

Tamagawa is not too bad for distance, but it's very narrow, and a lot of people use it on weekends - old couples, families etc, just going for a stroll, or taking their kids out on their new bikes. Only after you've gone up a certain distance can you really pick up the pace.

Edogawa is similar to Tamagawa in road width - ie. pretty narrow - but it's not as crowded. After you ride up about 10km/6miles, there are very few people. It's not as long as the other rivers (only 50km/30miles), but after that, it joins onto Tonegawa - the border between Chiba-prefecture and Ibaraki-prefecture.
I've never ridden along Tonegawa, but apparently, although it's really long, the road condition is not too good.

In the warmer months though, you can hit the mountains - Okutama-ko is a favorite! It's starting to get a bit too cold now, and it snows up there.
But come spring, there are quite a few good mountain roads in the Takao, Otsuki area - Training grounds for hill-climbing races.

Hope this helps!
Your best bet though, is to grab a map, and find your closest river.
Rubber down! T