Cycling in the Press

StuInTokyo

Maximum Pace
Dec 3, 2010
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#2
I was thinking......
Whomever decides these rules for cyclists and pedestrians should be forced to use both modes of transport for a good distance, say 30 minutes, to work each day for a month. Every day for a month they should have to get off the train a stop or two before they usually do and then walk for 30 minutes to their office, same with a cycling, they should have to ride 30 minutes to work for a month, only then will they be able to relate to all sides of the story and make some sort of informed decision. I worry that most of the guys making these rules up are transported to work each day in a car with a driver, and have no idea what it is like for the rest of us. If there really were some investigative reporters here in Japan, they would find out who the big wigs are on these rule committees and then follow them to and from work, with hidden cameras, for a week or two.
.... then I stopped daydreaming..... :rolleyes:
 

Desune

Speeding Up
May 7, 2008
64
0
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Tokyo
#3
When a cyclist hits a pedestrian, yes it can be pretty bad; but I think that pales in comparison to when a vehicle hits a cyclist.

If I ever get stopped for riding on the sidewalk with my 3-year-old in the back, I will gladly take a ticket over putting him in that kind of danger. But a 3-year-old life is no less precious than a 40-year-old life; why should I be forced to put myself at risk for doing my part to make the world a cleaner place? Cycling should be encouraged over driving for everyone in Tokyo.

If the goal is to minimize the number of injuries and deaths, then I don't think they should be pushing cyclists into the street until they put in dedicated bicycle lanes.
 

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
2,865
1,451
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#4
When a cyclist hits a pedestrian, yes it can be pretty bad; but I think that pales in comparison to when a vehicle hits a cyclist.

If I ever get stopped for riding on the sidewalk with my 3-year-old in the back, I will gladly take a ticket over putting him in that kind of danger. But a 3-year-old life is no less precious than a 40-year-old life; why should I be forced to put myself at risk for doing my part to make the world a cleaner place? Cycling should be encouraged over driving for everyone in Tokyo.

If the goal is to minimize the number of injuries and deaths, then I don't think they should be pushing cyclists into the street until they put in dedicated bicycle lanes.
I totally agree. I don't think they are goin to be pushing child laden mama charis onto the street. But young men and women riding solo at speed should be on the street. Every day I see young blokes flying along the sidewalk on their way to the station. Riding as if it was a road.

I think we will see some discretion used with any new initiative. Everyone knows the roads are crowded and a lot of drivers are impatient and disrespectful to any other road users.
 

Sikochi

Maximum Pace
Sep 13, 2010
1,185
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Kochi
#5
Two big pieces in today's Daily Yomiuri - 29 October 2011
Thanks for posting even though you probably broke a few laws yourself ;)
Think I would go with Carol`s and Anthony`s comments. I don`t see why they included comments from temporary residents.

If there really were some investigative reporters here in Japan, they would find out who the big wigs are on these rule committees and then follow them to and from work, with hidden cameras, for a week or two.
.... then I stopped daydreaming..... :rolleyes:
In the UK they followed some of the politicians who ride to work and found a myriad of traffic offenses, but the worst was the now prime minister, Mr Cameron, who was caught with his official car behind him acting as a luggage carrier. :hammer:
 
May 22, 2007
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#8
Not Japan. New York. Involves a different kind of police crackdown, in which bikes became part of the solution.

Billionaire Mayor Bloomberg outsmarted at every turn by smelly, unemployed, directionless kids

Last week, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg hoped to use an unannounced "health and safety inspection" to shut down #OccupyWallStreet once and for all. With cold weather coming, the NYPD and FDNY raided Zuccotti Park and seized the fuel and generators used by the demonstrators to power their media center and kitchen, among other necessities.

To many, it looked bleak for the movement. But the Occupiers are a resourceful bunch. Not inclined to surrender, a group of them drove up to Boston where they acquired a bunch of bicycle-based generators.

A cycling advocacy group called Times Up, helped out the demonstrators, doing an energy map of the park and determining that it would take 11 stationary bicycles pedaled continuously to keep everything humming. The bikes generate batteries which can last up to 100 hours and take care of all the Occupier's electricity needs. But it will take a lot of pedaling:

"It can take up to two hours of uninterrupted pedaling to reach 12.5 volts," said Ben Tevelow, an electrician from Brooklyn. He decided to join the project and put his skills to use when he heard about it in General Assembly.

We understand that there are about six bicycles hooked up right now, with several more to be assembled and put on the grid in the next few days. According to #OccupyWallStreet, it takes continuous pedaling of three bicycles to keep the media center running.

The bicycle generators give the saying "Power to the people" a whole new meaning.
 
May 22, 2007
3,630
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#12
Things You Need to Know if You Ride A Bike in Tokyo

Things You Need to Know if You Ride A Bike in Tokyo

http://metropolis.co.jp/podcast/2011/11/04/things-you-need-to-know-if-you-ride-a-bike-in-tokyo/

The newest fashion trend in Tokyo is to ride a bike with no brakes. We realize that sounds preposterous, but it’s true. Riding one of these new brakeless Piste bikes on the sidewalks of Tokyo is considered -by some- to be the coolest thing you can do on two wheels. So, what’s wrong with fashionable. you ask? People on the sidewalks are getting hurt…some seriously by these fast-peddling slaves to fashion. To get a little background on this new trend, we consulted with our opinionated film critic, Don Morton who runs his own bicycle club here in Tokyo.
 
May 22, 2007
3,630
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#13
Kuchikomi

Spotted this on Japan Today: "Cyclists feel under siege with new rules". The comments arguably are more interesting than the article.

The media kerfuffle about evil bicycle riders seems to have calmed down a little of late. I guess Olympus Inc. is a juicier target.

But for the first time in absolutely ages I saw a brakeless 'piste' (sic) bike on the road this morning. The rider was the archetypal J-poser replete with headphones, fedora hat, and oversized wallet in his back pocket attached by a battleship anchor chain. :wanker:
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
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Yokohama
#15
Things You Need to Know if You Ride A Bike in Tokyo

http://metropolis.co.jp/podcast/2011/11/04/things-you-need-to-know-if-you-ride-a-bike-in-tokyo/

The newest fashion trend in Tokyo is to ride a bike with no brakes. We realize that sounds preposterous, but it’s true. Riding one of these new brakeless Piste bikes on the sidewalks of Tokyo is considered -by some- to be the coolest thing you can do on two wheels. So, what’s wrong with fashionable. you ask? People on the sidewalks are getting hurt…some seriously by these fast-peddling slaves to fashion. To get a little background on this new trend, we consulted with our opinionated film critic, Don Morton who runs his own bicycle club here in Tokyo.
hmmmmmmm..........
 

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
2,865
1,451
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#16
What was the name of the club he runs?

I have my theories on what I thought he said, but I don't want to inadvertantly insult anyone until at least we have met in person!!:angel: