Cargo bikes

Saitaman

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Mar 2, 2018
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#1
Firstly apologies for not introducing myself yet nor locating the correct thread for this subject but in short I’m looking to buy any suitable kind of cargo bike (to transport half set of golf clubs amongst other things so I don’t have to use a car) and I just noticed the longtail ‘Hachi Hachi Cycle’ Asahi seem to have brought out in 2016. What is your opinion of it? I wonder who they’re trying to target with this bike? It’s nicknamed ‘Papa Chari’
http://www.cb-asahi.co.jp/sp/item/91/36/item100000043691.html
 

kiwisimon

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#2

kiwisimon

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#4
TBH, I wouldn't pay anything for a cargo bike. If you want to carry a half set of clubs strap them to a tube tube of a regular bike. What's fair? Maybe others here have a more informed opinion.
 

Saitaman

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Mar 2, 2018
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#6
Thanks, where do they come up with those prices, eh? Wonder how the old bill here would react to seeing me in the street or even on Tonegawa cycle path pulling one of those...
 

bloaker

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Nov 14, 2011
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#7
Personally - I love cargo bikes! I also do not have a need for bikes to be multipurpose really.

If I could get one at a reasonable price, I would be all over a Surly Big Fat Dummy.]
Main reason is hauling trail equipment. Even in the places I could not ride the bike, pushing up tools is easier than the current method of carrying them.
As for where would you park it? A fantastic issue to look at before purchasing. I know the grocery story I use most frequently has space as does my work and the post office. This type bike would be a tool for those specific purposes, so not an issue for me, but I can see the drawback.
Lastly, I have kid #2 on the way. A large cargo bike allows for 2 rear seats for the kids as well as room for beach toys. I live 3kms or so from the water, so again, the perfect weapon. And plenty of places to park.

I currently use an old MTB as a commuter with racks. While nice, it does have limitations to a cargo bike.
And conversely, the cargo bike will have limitations when compared to the MTB. You just have to be honest with yourself on how you are going to use it.

As for trailers - I have used them with a cyclo cross bike for a multiday trip on gravel roads and rail to trails paths... It works fantastic... until congestion.
 

Saitaman

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Mar 2, 2018
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#8
Yes even the Big Dummy Yoshida Cycle showed me on Friday.
Thanks for all these brilliant helpful posts, everybody. I can’t sleep with the ....after effects of all day hayfever exposure from yesterday’s bike riding.
I also use a MTB for my commute to the Shinkansen station, use backpack rather than racks, guess I’m a clumsy bastid hence the idea of how to transport my (and possibly the trouble & strife’s)golf sticks is causing me headaches...
 

OreoCookie

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Dec 2, 2017
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#9
A cargo bike is a van whereas an old mountain bike (or cyclocross bike) with panniers is like a station wagon. A few friends of mine with kids are using their baby bike trailers for grocery shopping. The weight limit for those is AFAIK 45 kg, so that's plenty for most things.

But honestly, the cargo bike that you linked to doesn't look very enticing. It looks like a bike where function follows form rather than form follows function for all the reasons mentioned in the thread already. It reminds me of a style of bike that is made for looks first (such as the fat bikes you see sometimes with 5 inch tires).

Lastly, I don't know how often you play golf or why your choices of transportation are car or cargo bike (what about public transportation?), but sometimes it is easier to just adapt in other ways. Perhaps buying a cargo bike is akin to buying a pickup truck just because perhaps you transport some furniture once a year. I'm not saying that this is necessarily the case here, but I just want to point out that there may be other options.
 

Saitaman

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Mar 2, 2018
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#11
OreoCookie, good question. I’m getting to the semi retired stage so will be in a position to play golf more often but public transport where I am won’t do the job, I have been putting off buying a car for years (for the obvious health & eco reasons).
I appreciate the candid evaluations on here (and that other thread) to the cumbersome Hachi Hachi Cycle. I still want to test ride one though to confirm it’s not the solution.
 

bloaker

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#13
The trio bike I imaging handles funny. At a pedestrian pace, I bet it is fun, but not sure how I would feel once speeds get over 20kph.
The Yuba I have seen before. The big turn off to me - that is a lot of mula for a low end build.

Another overpriced option... An Extra Cycle. You can convert an MTB into a Cargo bike. A local shop here has done it and I have seen it around Zushi running errands.

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#14
I don't know the particular Trio from Cargocycles, but I see lots of bikes of that type here in Berlin. Often they're used by mothers with two or three children and other stuff in the front.
So if properly build the handeling should be alright. But they're tanks by size and weight, which is no problem in all flat Berlin, where the roads are bad but much wider than in most inner city areas in Japan.

I kind of like this idea:

http://www.bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Inventions.htm

I'd imagine something like that could be easily build for the rear as well.
 
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Likes: Saitaman
#17
I haven't thought things through in terms of weight ballance etc. and also I don't know what kind of golf bag you've got, but I've got two ideas.

First:
Attach a decent wooden board to your pannier rack. To that attach a proper steel angle bend in the angle needed (this might be the hardest part, but I once got it done at my home center). Depending on rack and steel angle, the steel angle might could even be attached to the rack direktly. To that steel angle attach a board or even a light hand truck (the Ikea Frakta cost 1299 Yen and can be loaded with up to 30kg).

Second:
Take a proper, flat and widish rear pannier rack. Replace the joists (which connect the rack with the frame) with a pair long enough that the rack tilts backwards in an angle that allows you to strap the golf bag to it without interfering with your saddle. Depending on the size of your frame and type of rack the joists might need to get clamped to the seat post. In case your golf bag is not sturdy enough attach a board or hand truck to the rack.

There are two things that I'm concerned about: 1. Side stability (may could be fixed by crossing the joists; 2. Unbalanced weight distrubution towards the rear (may doesn't matter if your bike is a little on the heavy side).

I'd give it a try, just for the fun of it. And who knows? It might work.
In case you're going for anything like that, make sure to post a picture and let us know how it worked.

Other than that, I'd go with something like the trailer @Cactaur suggested.
 

Saitaman

Warming-Up
Mar 2, 2018
15
2
3
55
#18
I haven't thought things through in terms of weight ballance etc. and also I don't know what kind of golf bag you've got, but I've got two ideas.

First:
Attach a decent wooden board to your pannier rack. To that attach a proper steel angle bend in the angle needed (this might be the hardest part, but I once got it done at my home center). Depending on rack and steel angle, the steel angle might could even be attached to the rack direktly. To that steel angle attach a board or even a light hand truck (the Ikea Frakta cost 1299 Yen and can be loaded with up to 30kg).

Second:
Take a proper, flat and widish rear pannier rack. Replace the joists (which connect the rack with the frame) with a pair long enough that the rack tilts backwards in an angle that allows you to strap the golf bag to it without interfering with your saddle. Depending on the size of your frame and type of rack the joists might need to get clamped to the seat post. In case your golf bag is not sturdy enough attach a board or hand truck to the rack.

There are two things that I'm concerned about: 1. Side stability (may could be fixed by crossing the joists; 2. Unbalanced weight distrubution towards the rear (may doesn't matter if your bike is a little on the heavy side).

I'd give it a try, just for the fun of it. And who knows? It might work.
In case you're going for anything like that, make sure to post a picture and let us know how it worked.

Other than that, I'd go with something like the trailer @Cactaur suggested.
Thanks for taking the trouble to propose that. Beyond my capacities I’m afraid.