Buying entry level road bike - which one?

DanS

Warming-Up
Feb 7, 2009
8
0
0
Tokyo
#1
Hi all,
I've been a member for over year, but not gone on a single ride. I hope to improve that dismal record by finally buying a decent road bike to replace my banged-up MTB, which I will still use for commuting.
I'd therefore be very grateful if riders could recommend an entry level road bike at around 100,000 yen. I would like to up my training and go for longer rides, and eventually even a race. My training will be confined to the weekends, most likely, so I won't be doing anything too crazy. And if anyone is selling a second-hand bike, I'd also be interested!
Thanks in advance,
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,659
477
103
Japan
#2
first place to start is your sizing. If you know that, second hand bikes become a option. If you don't, then look at some online fit calculators. For your first roadie experience however I would recommend you find a shop recommended by the folks here at TCC and then try and get something that is on sale to make way for new stock. The shop will do the fit and kit and you'll have a place to get your servicing done. First few should be free. Good luck. Oh and red bikes are proven to be faster than any other colour.
 
May 22, 2007
3,590
1,412
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#3
@ DanS - I'd unhesitatingly recommend Sports Bike HiRoad, close to Musashi-koyama station on the Meguro line.

http://www.geocities.jp/bikehiroad/english/index.html

Call Aoyama-san (he runs the place on his own) to set up an appointment for fitting and purchase advise. He'll listen to what you want to do with the bike and your budget, and fill your brain with information worth its weight in aerospace-grade titanium. It's definitely worth the trip, even if you're far away.

03-6413-7168

Tell him Mike sent you, if you like.
 

DanS

Warming-Up
Feb 7, 2009
8
0
0
Tokyo
#4
Many thanks Kiwisimon and Mike. Going to a shop is probably the easiest way to do it. Btw, I notice blue GIOS bikes are everywhere, and relatively cheap at around 65,000. I have heard they are steel? And that GIOS is a very good Italian brand.
 

DanS

Warming-Up
Feb 7, 2009
8
0
0
Tokyo
#5
Mike, your point about servicing a bike from a good shop is a good one - guess I'd need one as close to home or work as possible, though. (I live in the Far East of Tokyo, across the Sumida).
 
May 22, 2007
3,590
1,412
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#7
(I live in the Far East of Tokyo, across the Sumida).
Ah - the flood plain. You might want to consider buying a life raft first.

Gios - to me they've always seemed like 'bikes for people who don't know much about bikes'. The colour is nice, but that's about all. IMHO.

If you speak Japanese, you can get fitted at any sports bike shop, but probably not as thoroughly as at HiRoad. Aoyama-san charges for his fitting service. If you then buy a bike from him he'll discount the cost of the fitting from your bike. But equally you can take the fitting data (a very detailed geometric diagram) to your LBS and say "I want that one in this size. In red."

If you or someone you know can read Japanese, there are listings and adverts in the back of Cycle Sports and other monthly publications which should help you locate a bike shop fairly close to you that can deal with road bikes.

Alternatively this might give you a guide Bicycle Map - the orange/white wrench icons indicate bike shops.

There's probably enough technical know-how in TCC to create our own interactive cycling-specific Google Map in English. Volunteers?

--Mike--
 

Phil

Maximum Pace
#8
Shops...

On the east side, there are a few shops concentrated in the Funabashi area, including 3 Seo Cycles. (Avoid the LaLaPort Y's Road--it has a large inventory but dreadful service). Giro House in Inage is quite good (and has shop rides/team). If you want English-speaking service, the manager of the Seo Cycle in Soga (just beyond Chiba Station) speaks excellent English, and they have a good stock of road bikes. Happy hunting.