Buying bolts - Tokyo??

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
1,199
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Tokyo
#1
I snapped a small bolt on my new K-edge; it's a 3mm Allen key.

Anyhow, does anyone know a large chain hardware store around Tachikawa or Hachioji? Etc?
 

GSAstuto

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Oct 11, 2009
945
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tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#2
Tokyu Hands has a pretty good selection. Just find a DIY place around your hood - often will these sorts of things. Bear in mind, most of the chain catchers and stuff use alloy bolts - harder to find. You dont want steel - it will rust or corrode making matters even worse. Unless it's the derailler mounting bolt , then you definitely want steel (stainless) or Ti.

I snapped a small bolt on my new K-edge; it's a 3mm Allen key.

Anyhow, does anyone know a large chain hardware store around Tachikawa or Hachioji? Etc?
 

j-sworks

Maximum Pace
Feb 5, 2012
1,199
48
68
Tokyo
#3
Tokyu Hands has a pretty good selection. Just find a DIY place around your hood - often will these sorts of things. Bear in mind, most of the chain catchers and stuff use alloy bolts - harder to find. You dont want steel - it will rust or corrode making matters even worse. Unless it's the derailler mounting bolt , then you definitely want steel (stainless) or Ti.
That's what I thought as far as the material, and I'll try Tokyu Hands and see what's up.

Thanks
 

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
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#7
I'd go ahead and use steel, but then replace it rather soon.
If it comes to that, but I need to replace some bolts on my bike anyhow so I will probably look for a few different alloy sizes.

It appears that the the air in Vancouver is different than in Tokyo, with regard to rusting stuff
 

StuInTokyo

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Dec 3, 2010
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#8
Certainly if you had an alloy bolt, replacing it with steel is not the best choice, but it could serve as a stopgap until you can get the alloy bolt. You can buy Anti-Seize compound here, Permatex if you are worried about the dissimilar metals getting stuck together. I like this stuff on my pedals, so they come off easy when the time comes to change them.

To stop stuff from rusting, I've found the CRC 3-36 sold here by KURE works really well. I use it on lots of stuff, the cast iron top of my tablesaw, my bikes and my hand planes too. It leaves no stinky residue either, which I like.
 

microcord

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Aug 28, 2012
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Tokyo
#13
The frame of my bike is steel. Various things have been screwed into it: the expected stuff, plus mudguards and a carrier rack. The bolts have required screwdrivers and/or spanners. Tired of carrying around heavy, jangly tools, I've wanted to replace them all with bolts for a hex key. The local "Astro Tools" sells what I want, but only in what seems to be aluminium. (Or anyway they're uninterested in a magnet, and they're cheap.) The local hardware store (seemingly with boxfuls of everything) sells what I want in stainless steel, but not for hex keys. LBS gave me a little handful of steel bolts for a hex key, but in just three weeks or so they've rusted up. (Plenty of "stainless steel" isn't, of course; but these don't even pretend to be stainless.) Am I right in not trusting aluminium? If I should be using stainless steel, where can I buy the bolts?

米訳: mudguard = fender / spanner = wrench / aluminium = aluminum
 

kiwisimon

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Dec 14, 2006
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Japan
#14
Certainly if you had an alloy bolt, replacing it with steel is not the best choice, but it could serve as a stopgap until you can get the alloy bolt. You can buy Anti-Seize compound here, Permatex if you are worried about the dissimilar metals getting stuck together. I like this stuff on my pedals, so they come off easy when the time comes to change them.

To stop stuff from rusting, I've found the CRC 3-36 sold here by KURE works really well. I use it on lots of stuff, the cast iron top of my tablesaw, my bikes and my hand planes too. It leaves no stinky residue either, which I like.
Go with alloy, light and cheap and readily available
 
Aug 27, 2012
581
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73
London, UK
www.macrophotofly.com
#16
Bare aluminium to bare steel creates a battery affect which corrodes aluminium faster than steel rusts (especially when water is present). It's the reason aluminium parts on a car have taken so long to be developed for regular use. Thankfully those bolts are likely to be an alu alloy, you will put grease on the bolt, and your bike will avoid sitting in rain 365 days a year. So you should be fine, but check one or two of the bolts in 3 months time that they haven't started to whiten over
I took 4 alu bolts out of a steel rack yesterday and they were powdering