Built up my new bike - Ritchey Logic

bloaker

Maximum Pace
Nov 14, 2011
1,533
1,203
433
Miura, Japan
#1
I have turned over quite a few bikes over the past few years. Each one has had something I liked and each one had something I did not like. After selling my Cross Bike and Aluminum Road bike, it was time to add a new bike!
Frame:
After phone calls, emails, research, I found the Ritchey Logic frame to be closest to what I want without going custom build.
Components:
I also am fond of the 'feel' if campy hoods and decided to go with the Chorus 11 group.
Wheels:
I am a Clydesdale and strong reliable wheels are important! Even if 24 or 28 spokes can hold up as many advertise, if there is doubt in my mind - I don't want them. I have had Chris King hubs on two different mountain bikes and decided to stick to what I know and have had no issued with - so a set of 32 spoke R45s laced up to DT Swiss RR465.

When built I weighed it with the unscientific method of weighing myself, then weighing myself holding the bike. It came it at 8.6kg. Not bad for a steel bike.

 

Gunjira

Maximum Pace
Oct 2, 2009
1,002
176
83
Tokyo
#4
Very nice! Love the details of your build, like the carbon chainstay protector. Looks even lighter than it is, bravo.

Having just decided to get a custom steel bike built myself, what tubing did you use?
 

m o b

Speeding Up
Jun 22, 2008
341
23
38
Bremen
cyclitis.wordpress.com
#6

bloaker

Maximum Pace
Nov 14, 2011
1,533
1,203
433
Miura, Japan
#9
Oh yeah, it did take a long time, but I am very happy with what I decided on and who I decided to order it through.
Took the bike for a spin today and found a few little tweaks here and there than need to be done, however it is meeting all my expectations and then some.
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,656
475
103
Japan
#10
Ritchey has their proprietary tubing, so I am not sure of the specifics of the material, however it is heat treated and triple butted.
I would think that TR is still using Tange for his tubing and with Tange pulling tubes in Taiwan and TR using a Taiwanese builder it just makes sense. I have an old RB1 in my shed that I need to get a seatpost reamed out of, there is a hole in the same seat post that needs filling but I am looking forward to the day I can ride it. Had an MB1 back in '92 that also had a TR crown fork on it. All the idiots with their GT RTS bikes and 1" Rockshox forks never knew it was just over priced heavy bling that slowed them down anytime the slope went up or they used the rear wheel brakes(lock out). Oh those were great days.

All you need now is one of these.
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bloaker

Maximum Pace
Nov 14, 2011
1,533
1,203
433
Miura, Japan
#11
Ritchey may have a deal with Tange - however they are not identifying tange anywhere in the company.
Salsa is similar in this respect... 'proprietary tubing' is what they claim.
The actual manufacturer is never identified.
Tange, Columbus, Reynolds.... ???
There is no downside to using any of these manufacturers, but it seems int he case of Salsa and Ritchey they have no desire to identify who is making their tubing.

And yes, the new P-29 is appealing.
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But right now, I cannot justify a mountain bike.
If/When the wife and I move, trails will be on the list of things to investigate prior to moving.
 

Tim Kendall

Speeding Up
Aug 11, 2013
42
11
28
53
Seto-shi, Aichi, Japan
#13
Just thought I get my hand in here.
My Wife is currently one of 3 distributors for Ritchey in Japan, and has exclusivity on all Ritchey wheels, including Road and MTB. She also holds stock of frames, including the Ritchey Logic road fram, and P-650b MTB frame.
If you are thinking about a very very good deal.... her website is http://www.catarina-w.jp/ and, there is an online shopping portal on that site. Alternatively, send her a mail through the webpage.... or directly to me.
I am sure she can do some special deals for TCC members.
 
Dec 31, 2009
906
87
48
Matsumoto
#15
I saw Tom Ritchey riding around in Marin County, California on several occasions, as did many of my friends and colleagues. He definitely has "local hero" status. Once I was kitted up in my fresh race gear pounding up a mountain when he came spinning by me on an old steel 8 speed bike. Helmet less in jeans and a t shirt he effortlessly commented on how hard the climb was and that he was in a hurry and had to push on. The next time he was on rad a tandem with a pretty gal.

With a tall lanky climbers build, sporting a rare vintage helmet or none at all, usually pushing the finest steel machine you'd ever ride that's probably his Tuesday bike the telltale sign that its TR is his mustache that can be seen from several kilometers away. He attends local sanctioned races in Masters category and has been seen at Grasshopper races. These races draw out the cream of the crop. True American racing legends show up to these impromptu events that are unsanctioned, un numbered grass roots racing California Style that often including mixed terrain. The culture of cycling in California is amazing and Tom has always been apart of the innovation and design of the modern bicycle along with many others coming from the Bay Area (Gary Fisher, Keith Bontrager, Jobst Branst, Steve Graveston, John Slawta, Charlie Kelly, Joe Breeze. This article is interesting http://www.switchbackmb.com/Trail/content/18/1378/6-Degrees-of-Tom-Ritchey)

His ideas on bike fit have shaped the way I perform bike fits to this day with his "Myth Of KOPS" essay as well as many articles that are very difficult to surface on the web that some lucky people have archived. He has basically said that he has locked up most of his secrets because they are to complex to explain. Things about frame geometry and balance. I bet in the future things will be looked at and considered that he invented when we can look past the modern design of the UCI bicycle.


This is who you should want a bike that you ride designed by.
 

Tim Kendall

Speeding Up
Aug 11, 2013
42
11
28
53
Seto-shi, Aichi, Japan
#16
A majority of Bike fit organizations have no idea on how to fit the bike to the individual.
It takes many years until you know what is good for you, and what works. I think James would agree with me on this point.
Looking at a frame, and trying it out in the bast way... but how?
 
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