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Ratchet21

Speeding Up
Sep 7, 2020
110
82
I have an Elemnt Bolt, and it is very easy to use. The main difference to Garmin is that Wahoo cycling computers allow you to zoom in and out of pages, i. e. where Garmin forces you to create different pages, you can change the number of data fields with the zoom feature.

With the Wahoo you can plan a route, but you do it on the phone and then sync the route to your cycling computer via Bluetooth. Even if I could do it on the Element, I don’t think I’d want to if I can whip out the phone and have a substantially larger screen and a much faster CPU.

As far as following a route, the Bolt taken together with a smartphone works alright. I would not use it for free flowing navigation, but it works really well if you want to stick to a specific route. But since I always carry my phone with me, that’s not an issue: I check maps on my phone should I get lost and/or want to navigate and then I can stick to the Wahoo.

I found no fault with the GPS function so far. With the speed sensor speed and other measurements remain reliable even in tunnels or forests where the GPS signal may be spotty.

As with any piece of technology, nothing is flawless. E. g. sometimes my Bolt would no longer show phone notifications while riding. And they could put in a CPU. I’d also like the Roam’s new color screen and gorilla glass.
That sounds like what I need! Thank you for sharing! Was contemplating between the this and edge series but Bolt's simple interface looks better to me.
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,924
2,107
How do you find the GPS function so far? I read that it can't plan a route or fix a route if you go off course on the fly but is the navigation function user friendly/dependable?
Like @OreoCookie I'm happy to use the phone if I have to re-route from a planned course.

You can always map a route on RWGPS, then sync it to the Bolt. I used it that way for the 400 km ride from Aichi to Tokyo and it worked well. I like the way it announces turns coming up, with sound and a flashing row of LEDs at the top that tell you to turn right or left or to keep straight at an intersection. Hard to miss turns!

The maps are quite decent when you're zoomed in to the street level, but not so great when zoomed out to get an overview while not navigating because then it doesn't fade out enough detail. I was amazed when I did some Veloviewer tiling on a mountain in Chichibu and even a tiny hiking path forking off the main hiking trail was still on the map of what is essentially a cycling GPS. That's way more detail than what Google Maps would show me and a nice surprise.

I have not used the bundled heart rate belt yet and I am using a different brand of speed and cadence sensor, but both work reliably. Previously I didn't have a speed or cadence sensor or my Elephant NFE which meant distances through tunnels went unrecorded on Strava. Much better to have those sensors!

Initial GPS location is very quick. On my previous device I used to have to wait up to two minutes when I stepped outside before I could start recording, but with the Bolt it takes almost no time. If you start riding without manually starting the recording it alerts you and asks if you want to start recording.

The screen is very readable and you can zoom in or out, which trades off number of fields shown simultaneously vs. font size. The display pages are well thought out and easy to customize.
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
1,400
1,138
You can always map a route on RWGPS, then sync it to the Bolt. I used it that way for the 400 km ride from Aichi to Tokyo and it worked well. I like the way it announces turns coming up, with sound and a flashing row of LEDs at the top that tell you to turn right or left or to keep straight at an intersection. Hard to miss turns!
One more thing about route selection: if you want to go from A to B and let the phone or Google or Apple Maps decide on the route, pay attention and use your brain. If I use Wahoo's Take Me to … feature, I usually found the routes very tricky to follow as it'd often send me down fire and farm roads between fields parallel to some small country roads that weren't paved — suboptimal if you are on a regular road bike. And it'd insist on using really small roads with tons of turns.

The other map apps do the opposite: they usually send you down really big road, including toll roads if you are not paying attention. Even if you can ride them, perhaps you don't want to as it might be too heavily trafficked.

Strava's route creator works very well in my experience, especially once I get out of the innards of Sendai city proper. Or you can create routes manually with apps like Ride with GPS (RWGPS mentioned above). “Good” routes are almost invariably those that you have created yourself or some local has suggested to you. Experience with the local roads matters a great deal in order to find goldi locks routes with so little traffic that you can relax and focus on the ride, but that is not so remote that there isn't a temple, konbini or restaurant to refuel. :)
 

Winston Leg-Thigh

Maximum Pace
Mar 31, 2015
120
121
Strava's route creator works very well in my experience, especially once I get out of the innards of Sendai city proper. Or you can create routes manually with apps like Ride with GPS (RWGPS mentioned above). “Good” routes are almost invariably those that you have created yourself or some local has suggested to you. Experience with the local roads matters a great deal in order to find goldi locks routes with so little traffic that you can relax and focus on the ride, but that is not so remote that there isn't a temple, konbini or restaurant to refuel. :)

Just to add that RWGPS have got heat maps, too, now (desktop and mobile app). AFAIK the heatmap is free on the mobile app but might not be on the desktop version.
 

jonmanjiro

Warming-Up
Dec 29, 2019
13
13
Thank you for the information! How do you find the GPS function so far? I read that it can't plan a route or fix a route if you go off course on the fly but is the navigation function user friendly/dependable?
You've already got some great replies here, so I'll just add a few comments. The Bolt can be used without your phone easily enough, but its actually designed to work with a companion app on your phone. The app has a "Take me to" option for selecting a route, which is super convenient. You just find the location you want to ride to, upload it to the Bolt, and away you go. It takes merely seconds. The Bolt doesn't fix your route if you go off course, but if that happens you can just cancel the current route, then re-upload a new route using the "Take me to" option. You can also plan routes in RWGPS or Strava and upload them to the Bolt. RWGPS works better with the Bolt though, as the uploaded data has contains direction information that the Bolt can use, whereas the Strava data just gives you a map to follow.
 

microcord

Maximum Pace
Aug 28, 2012
1,040
471
Unfortunately my GPS/cycling stats from my phone was not accurate at all so hopefully with a cycling computer I can keep track of my speed and distance better.
My Cat-Eye device cost me 5000 yen or so and shows speed, distance, maximum speed, average speed, and a couple more things.

Perhaps I could pair it with a shop display dummy Garmin/Wahoo for its (dummy) heart-rate and power functions. With a magic marker, I'd write on its screen "You're not going to die" for the former and "You suck" for the latter.
 

Ratchet21

Speeding Up
Sep 7, 2020
110
82
Cycled around 180-190km last week but I don't think my phone app will be as accurate as a proper bike computer so can't wait to get one!
I have also found a buyer for my folding bike and sold few other stuff so will be looking to get a trainer soon! While I like to cycle outside it will be great to be able to train at home too away from the harsh weather and also as my work is starting to get busy too in December so having a trainer will let me cycle more.

Am looking at either Tacx Neo T2, Kickr or Kickr Core, I have been reading around and find out that both Neo T2 and Kickr have quite the same durability problem (hit or miss), so mostly it will boils down to preference. I know a lot of people here are using Neo T2, anyone with Kickr (or both before) and can share any experience with it?
 

Elzico2012

Maximum Pace
Jan 29, 2014
109
137
Among other deals, not directly due to Black Friday, I believe, but the helmet Kask Mojito is about half price now, just over 9000yens on Wiggle and CRC. I bought one here a few years ago for twice that. So I decided to go for an extra one. The actual one is in a good state, as not hit reported, but the leather strap starts to get damaged with the continuous sweat.
Would have like to go for the upper model, the Protone, but it was over the allowed budget.
Many helmets are too big for my small head, specially the local brand Kabuto, but the Kask one does fit well.
 
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