Bikes On The Shinkansen?

Doomith

Warming-Up
Nov 27, 2010
10
0
0
Australia
#1
Hi all,
I'm planning a trip to cycle down the east coast of Japan on my single speed with a small trailer for my gear.

I've plotted up to Atami but the mountain range seems quite large to pass over (esp with no gears!)

I was _hoping_ I would be able to catch the shinkansen to Shinfuji with bike and trailer.

I've been on the shinkansen before and I know space is very limited, however it would only be for 1 stop (around 12 minutes according to the time table).

Would I be allowed / be able to get away with it ?

Thoughts please!
 

laz

Warming-Up
Sep 2, 2009
61
1
0
Tokyo, Mitaka
#3
You may try your luck by looking for the space in the last seats. Usually there are spaces in every car behind the last seat that be able to put a 3 to 4 30L suitcases that will fit your bike.
 
May 22, 2007
3,564
1,379
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#4
Yes you can take a bike (and trailer) on the Shinkansen. But you will have to cover it up - ideally by putting it in a bike bag but if this would be the only time for you to use it then a makeshift one can be made from garbage bags and tape available at a convenience store.

For one stop (to avoid the Hakone climb) it's hardly worth sitting down - I'd just stay in the area by the doors with your vehicle.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#10
Transpo Econo Rinko --
Method A: Standard Bike:

SBSH0162.JPG


2 Bags for the bike and another couple for the wheels.

Method B: S&S Coupler

101128_164451_00.jpg


Bike splits in 2 pieces (with wheels). Just cover the wheels is enough. In fact, I don't bother with that anymore - I just cover the chainring with a small backpack cover. No complaints so far (JR East, Odakyu, Hayate Shinkansen)

I'd suspect you'd need a folding trailer - or something akin to the trailer Gunjira pointed out - to get it neatly on the train. Like this .. http://www.freeparable.com/t1#slider-nid529

Can't help noticing - that saddle is hella nose high! And, oh, you'll prolly get busted for not having 2 brakes. Sadly, the cops here have gotten really snicky about ANY BIKE that seems to be marginally 'fixie' - even if its not. Roadfixie riders are at the same status and attention as bosozoku members these days.
 

Doomith

Warming-Up
Nov 27, 2010
10
0
0
Australia
#11
Hey! Thanks for the info!
What is a "bosozoku" ?

I'm building a new bike which I will be using for this trip which I will _probably_ install two brakes on!

Does your frame pull apart? Looks like it's in two halves in the 2nd photo!

When I travelled around Japan on holiday suitcases were fine and I'm sure that a little trailer wouldn't really be much trouble?
 

sunil

Warming-Up
Dec 5, 2010
12
0
0
Tokyo
#13
Bike porter bag at bid camera

Just brought my bike back on the Shinkansen from Nagoya last night. Used a bike bag that I purchased for about 2500 yen at Bic camera in Yurakucho. Just took the front wheel off and covered the bike with the bag. Has a shoulder strap as well.
No issues from the shikansen staff and they helped me find a spot on the train as well. Behind the last seats in the car.
mo issues at all.

.......Sunil
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#16
Actually I've found them to be pretty cool to cyclists - Comin down Otarumi one time was dicing it with some 'super rat' 50's zoku guys - one of them had a Polini <pistons> sticker on his ride - I commented and we all ended up at some bar / snack in Takao. Couldn' resist. I guess fixies and 'zoku just mix that way..

Basically, it means "Motorcycle hoodlum". Check out the Wikipedia version here.
They are the bane of many a cyclist. There are a few roads that the police have banned (tried to ban?) them from. But they can be a nuisance on other roads.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#17
Tim.... I've also had no issues with bikers in Japan. In fact I have found them a lot more respectful to me as a fellow two wheeler than most motorists.