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jdd

Maximum Pace
Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
3,076
1,511
Joe--that first shot is obviously a good one, but there's something interesting about the fourth (colors, feel?)...
 

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
3,021
3,232
My experience of cassettes, even top end Dura Ace, is that if you ride them in heavy rain, and then leave them overnight, the orange will begin to show. After a wet ride, I clean the cassette, pulleys, chain ring and chain with a hard brush and household detergent. Rinse. Dry. Then treat the chain with a good lube like Exlub, run it through the gears a few times. Dry again. And you have a silky smooth drive chain.

If I had to leave a bike outdoors for a long period, I would go a little crazier with the lube and without toweling it off, put the bike under a rain protective cover.

Andy
 

jdd

Maximum Pace
Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
3,076
1,511
I watch a lot of numberphile, and this isn't really cycling, but can you count to 12 or 13...? (jump up to 0:26 for the real start)

 

speedwobble

Scorpions - I can't get enough!
Jun 26, 2017
232
318
The biggest difference for me is the amount of maintenance. With hydros I can replace the pads and then literally not touch the brakes again until the next set of pads will be due many months later. That's because they are self-adjusting. With mechanical brakes I'd have to fiddle with Allen keys to make up for pad wear every 200 km or so (it varies with make of brake caliper and pad type, some combinations are much worse than others). That was my biggest gripe.
I used TRP Spyres, a cable-actuated caliper with two moving pads for about 3000km in the mountains, and that's exactly what they are like. You get good braking, because both pads move, but lots of messing about to keep them working well. That one uses a 3mm allen key, which isn't very big and has to be inserted through the spokes to adjust the inner pad. It's bad enough at home, but trying to do that with the 3mm on a multitool when you are out is fiddly. You also have to adjust cable tension as your cable stretches and also as the pads wear down and the bite point changes.

The stopping power itself was very good, and cable discs have no risk of brake fade due to oil overheating. This saves you buying expensive rotors. Since cable disc calipers can be used with older and/or cheap drop handlebar shifters, they can still be a good choice for some setups. Mtb hydros are cheap and separate to shifters, so cable disc brakes have no place on a flat bar bike.
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
1,832
1,626
My experience of cassettes, even top end Dura Ace, is that if you ride them in heavy rain, and then leave them overnight, the orange will begin to show. After a wet ride, I clean the cassette, pulleys, chain ring and chain with a hard brush and household detergent. Rinse. Dry. Then treat the chain with a good lube like Exlub, run it through the gears a few times. Dry again. And you have a silky smooth drive chain.
In my experience at least, the amount of rust is on an entirely different level, though. My mountain bike has only a little if any rust on the chain, none on any of the cassettes. Not so for my wife‘s bike or my neighbors‘s bikes. Especially the largest cog on the Shimano’s cheapest groupsets is a rust magnet, and it doesn‘t look like surface rust. I‘m not saying this can‘t be dealt with proper maintenance, but the materials in Shimano‘s cheaper groupsets just seem to be cheaper and are more prone to rust.

PS Surface rust of especially screws in Japan‘s weather is almost unavoidable. My mountain bike had it within two weeks of coming to Japan for the first time when it was brand new (it was literally two weeks old when I came to Fukuoka). My new road bike that I only keep indoors also has some rust on the screw for the cap on the stem. I‘m thinking of getting a titanium screw because it is somewhat of an eye sore and I get to look at it a lot while riding.
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
1,832
1,626
The stopping power itself was very good, and cable discs have no risk of brake fade due to oil overheating. This saves you buying expensive rotors.
Although overheating is exceedingly rare in normal use with proper braking technique. I don‘t think I have ever managed to overheat my brakes. My brother did, but that was with very old, very cheap brakes with tiny disc rotors. Once I had brake fade in my fingers, descending >1,000 m of elevation from Monte Tremalzo at Lake Garda.
Since cable disc calipers can be used with older and/or cheap drop handlebar shifters, they can still be a good choice for some setups. Mtb hydros are cheap and separate to shifters, so cable disc brakes have no place on a flat bar bike.
Being able to make bikes cheaper is the only reason they are still around with drop bar bikes and outside of Japan they are basically extinct on flat bar bikes. (I hadn‘t seen them on a mountain bike before moving to Japan.) Like you correctly write, they have become so cheap that it makes no sense to go for cable-actuated disc brakes. In my experience, cable-actuated disc brakes also don‘t have nowhere near the same bite and require more force to generate an equivalent amount of braking power. So in Europe where mountain biking is more of a thing they are a no-no.

I have used cable-actuated brakes on a test bike once. Someone thought it was a good idea to DuraAce Di2 rim brake levers on a top spec aero disc brake road bike. Gearing was also weird, the top gear was a 46:9 = 5.1 = 56:11. Totally unusable where we live. Three times the
owner of my LBS told me that braking power was poor. I‘m glad he did, because it was and I didn‘t feel 100 % safe to let it rip. I ended up writing to the manufacturer, telling them that this wasn‘t a good idea, especially if you want to convince roadies of the advantages of disc brakes.
 

microcord

Maximum Pace
Aug 28, 2012
1,179
703
Today, その壹

Four days late, but I've just noticed the article "A cycle through Spanish history: retracing the 1941 Vuelta a España" at The Guardian. It's Tim Moore's description of an epic/insane/brutal [choose your cliche] ride around Spain, of course on an old bike. If you don't recognize the name, perhaps you'll recognize one of the titles French Revolutions, Gironimo!, and The Cyclist Who Went out in the Cold, each of which describes an improbable, epic/insane/brutal ride on a bike (and all but the first, on an improbable bike).

The article is somewhat more sober than the preceding books, and not only because the ride has Covid as its backdrop. There's a falangist history to the ride. So perhaps the book, Vuelta Skelter, will be half Moore as I'm accustomed to him, half more like Tom Isitt's Riding in the Zone Rouge. But I'm still looking forward to it. I'm a stingy bastard, so I'll hold off till the cheaper paperback comes out; but you people in gainful employment are likely to get your money's-worth with the hardback.

I was wondering while riding my chari this morning: Where next for Moore? Got it! When "45" is finally indicted, perhaps a celebratory Tour de Rump.

Today, その貳

However, I only wonder about such things when I'm satisfied that there are no dangers. When I sense a potential danger, I do focus my atrophying mind on it. Thus this morning I was careful along Tamagawa when catching up with two kids on their charis. The bigger one was trying to impress his kid brother with exaggerated zigzags. All of this was at perhaps 18 km/h; this is quite a bit slower than even my cruising speed (and I'm capable of a few metres of grandpa-level "sprinting"), so I presumed that I'd manage to overtake him quickly and neatly. But, sensing my presence, he sped up to perhaps 27; and just when I was about to pass him, he slammed on his brakes, hard, because carefree youth. Luckily I was to the right of him so I sailed past; there was no human roadkill to sully the lurid green beauty of my bike. That's a new item to add to my mental list of Tamagawa dangers. (Still at the top is the runners/joggers whose trajectories look predictable but who can and do make U-turns anywhere.)
 

luka

Maximum Pace
Jan 13, 2015
2,217
2,049
the real question is: "if I ordered a new bike, would I be a little mad or a lot mad?" don't you have like twenty already haha
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
1,832
1,626
the real question is: "if I ordered a new bike, would I be a little mad or a lot mad?" don't you have like twenty already haha
At this point, why even tell? Would his wife really notice another one? 20? 21? 30? What’s the difference? Or does she keep accurate count because of past trauma?
 

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
3,021
3,232
In my experience at least, the amount of rust is on an entirely different level, though. My mountain bike has only a little if any rust on the chain, none on any of the cassettes. Not so for my wife‘s bike or my neighbors‘s bikes. Especially the largest cog on the Shimano’s cheapest groupsets is a rust magnet, and it doesn‘t look like surface rust. I‘m not saying this can‘t be dealt with proper maintenance, but the materials in Shimano‘s cheaper groupsets just seem to be cheaper and are more prone to rust.

PS Surface rust of especially screws in Japan‘s weather is almost unavoidable. My mountain bike had it within two weeks of coming to Japan for the first time when it was brand new (it was literally two weeks old when I came to Fukuoka). My new road bike that I only keep indoors also has some rust on the screw for the cap on the stem. I‘m thinking of getting a titanium screw because it is somewhat of an eye sore and I get to look at it a lot while riding.
Titanium screws are great but you need to remember that a titanium screw will be stronger than any carbon or aluminum parts you are clamping it too, so there is a risk of overtightening and if you crash other parts, for example a carbon seatpost or handlebar will fail before your titanium screws.

For the location you are talking about, this shouldn't be a problem. But I'd advise going with stainless steel screws. Cheaper and don't rust.

I have stainless steel screws on my road bike and zero rust.

My gravel bike's screws around the stem and handlebars have a similar problem to what you are experiencing. Now I treat them with some rust cleaner each time I wash the bike, but will probably get stainless steel once they get too messy.

When the time comes, if you remove a screw from your bike and take it to a home centre, they will find you the size or cut it for you.

Andy
 

bloaker

Sincerely A Dick
Nov 14, 2011
3,067
4,604
Are you (finally) running out of luck? ;):flip:
It's never really been luck - She is pretty understanding and she sees they do not collect dust.
the real question is: "if I ordered a new bike, would I be a little mad or a lot mad?" don't you have like twenty already haha
There is a total of 10 bikes at my home here and 2 back in the states. But of the 10 here, 6 are actually mine. My girls have 3 and my wife has 1. And at work I have 3. One is mine, one my wife's and one my oldest daughter. (we sometimes ride together after work before getting my youngest from daycare).
At this point, why even tell? Would his wife really notice another one? 20? 21? 30? What’s the difference? Or does she keep accurate count because of past trauma?
My wife doesn't really know the number. She knows I have bought a lot and she has been aware of each purchase. BUT - I have also sold a lot and she isn't aware of that number either. Depending on the day, If I told her I had 10 bikes she would either be shocked it is so many or surprised it is so few... depends on where her brain is at the moment.

This may sound silly - but we have joint accounts on everything. So if she looks, she can see where the money goes. I never want to have an uncomofrtable conversation - so we talk about every purchase over $100 or so.

Financially we are OK. It was maybe just one or two weeks ago I sat down with out retirements and built out a plan that is very acheivable... except I didn't build in a bike fund. :( Looking at my bikes now - until I move to a different area - there is no real gap in what I have vs what is available to ride. So any purchase now is just some odd sexy bike that has caught my eye. And for the most part - if it catches my eye - it will be a > $5k USD bike.

So really this is $5k bike and how does it hit the retirement plan I just made and went over with my wife...
Even if she were to say yes... I would almost be upset because then I have to say 'no' to myself.

The bike in question....
 

BeerTengoku

Maximum Pace
Mar 14, 2021
104
173
Had a simple ride out - the longest ride for a while really, but it was more to tune up the new bike and to see what needs to be changed up. I could do with raising the seat height a bit, but the handlebars were sorted out nicely. Moreover, it was also shown that tyre pressure is a little low, so should get a pump with a PSI gauge on it.
  1. The bridge of the River Sakai - got here in about 30mins from my house and love this road during the morning - land breeze to help you get to the beach but post lunch time, and it's a headwind down. Still, a nice cooling breeze. As soon as I stopped though, I drenched myself in sweat due to a lack of the breeze. Lots of water consumed here, and an ice cream too while waiting for my friend to turn up.
  2. Trying out some framebags and thinking about what kind of bottle cages / storage cage to put on the front. Thinking some Blackburns as they have adjustable straps. Still, having the options is brilliant, though the bike bag can't be seen underneath. The Merida is also more stable than previous rides on gravel due to the 38s - larger than usual for me.
  3. Some beer with my friend at a place called Heiwa, just outside of Katase-Enoshima - though food out of sight. Nothing big or heavy today but good for the soul to get out with a mate and share some laughs over cold suds.
  4. Another friend turned up and we looked like a motley crew with our bikes - a foldie, a frankenbike, and my Merida. All sturdy rides and all the owners happy.
  5. Sunset over Enoshima.
I haven't done much cycling this month - been spending a lot of time with the kids, but yesterday's ride of around 50km was just what the doctor ordered. I somehow need to find the energy / time after work to get out, without trying to drink as soon as I come in from work. Any advice would be great. :D
 

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speedwobble

Scorpions - I can't get enough!
Jun 26, 2017
232
318
Nice sunset! That looks like a good little trip with three very different bikes. I've got two cheap folders, a 16" one I picked up locally off Facebook and a 20" one I got when my wife said I should get another because there was no point taking one bike camping. Having ridden both, the 16" was good enough to want to buy another folder, but I prefer the 20" size and could happily ride it all day. If you have kids, small wheel bikes make it easier to ride with them and not 20m ahead of them, before you notice and hit the brakes.
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
1,832
1,626
This may sound silly - but we have joint accounts on everything. So if she looks, she can see where the money goes. I never want to have an uncomofrtable conversation - so we talk about every purchase over $100 or so.
This is not silly at all, I think it is super smart. Many men (myself included) are not very smart when it comes to money.

I do that, too, it is really important to have buy-in and be honest with each other. On the other hand, I feel bad buying big things for myself sometimes. Once you get used to it and my wife realized that I respect her no (for whatever reason), it really helped. My new road bike is literally the most expensive single item I ever bought for myself. But I had saved up my money and did not need to touch our (usual) savings, so I wasn't buying on credit.

She said when she turns 40, she wants a nice trip in Europe. Alright, fair enough, I'm lucky that she wants something we can share as a family, so I am getting to eat my cake and have it, too.
Financially we are OK. It was maybe just one or two weeks ago I sat down with out retirements and built out a plan that is very acheivable... except I didn't build in a bike fund. :( Looking at my bikes now - until I move to a different area - there is no real gap in what I have vs what is available to ride. So any purchase now is just some odd sexy bike that has caught my eye. And for the most part - if it catches my eye - it will be a > $5k USD bike.
Once you have nice equipment, you get really spoiled. When I ordered my bike I wanted Red cranks, but they were backordered even more than the Force cranks (they are 200 g lighter!). And I caught myself looking at bike24.com and thinking “240 € for a pair of Red crankarms, that's not too bad …” I gotta be careful with that addiction.

I think if I had the option of owning more than two bikes, I totally would. I don't think I'd have as many as you, but I'd certainly have at least 4, e. g. a cyclocross bike, a proper mountain bike, a road bike and a commuter.
So really this is $5k bike and how does it hit the retirement plan I just made and went over with my wife...
Even if she were to say yes... I would almost be upset because then I have to say 'no' to myself.

The bike in question....
To quote my wife: “At least you are not into cars.”
 

bloaker

Sincerely A Dick
Nov 14, 2011
3,067
4,604
To quote my wife: “At least you are not into cars.”
umm... not in Japan.

My old pickup is at my parents and it is my last V8.
The car crash I have referenced in past posts was an old AMX. I have been searching for a replacement.
Either another 68-70 AMX or I have also accepted I could end up with a 1962 Mercury Comet S22 Convertible.
Looking at the prices of new trucks, I have also looking into the 1964 Galaxy 500 as a towing vehicle...

I have no love for new cars - but for some of the classics - sigh
 

jdd

Maximum Pace
Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
3,076
1,511
... (Still at the top is the runners/joggers whose trajectories look predictable but who can and do make U-turns anywhere.)
There used to be a fellow on a path here that would run zigzags in bursts, I guess high intensity or something. You quickly learned who it was, and to call out well in advance. He'd suddenly go from a casual kind of walking to an as-fast-as-possible zigzagging. Yowser!
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
1,832
1,626
umm... not in Japan.
😅
I have no love for new cars - but for some of the classics - sigh
I realized how much I turned into a cranky old, well, strike that, middle-aged man when I rented two cars earlier this year in Germany, and I hated them. Both were pseudo-SUVs, and they did not handle as nicely as a standard car on the Autobahn. The both had DSGs that really did not want to be driven manually (even when switching the gear box to manual mode, after a few minutes it would switch back to automatic mode). And I was fighting with all the assistants: how do I switch it on, do I really trust it, is it doing something sensible? In a sense, I was in the uncanny valley of driving aids: they were good enough most of the time, but not enough to trust them completely. And I needed to understand them, i. e. the experience was anything but seamless.

I really long for the car my dad had in the late 1980s/early 1990s: a S124 E-class station wagon with a 3.2 liter inline-6. Beautiful, timeless design, very comfortable, fast enough for my purposes (220 hp) and had tons of space. While part of me wants this car, I know myself: I have no time and penchant to fix an old car to keep it on the road.
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
1,832
1,626
I have stainless steel screws on my road bike and zero rust.
Or do that. I am not a huge friend of Ti screws for the reasons you give and because they are usually marketed at people who want to bling up their bike. That's not my jam.

It is a bit surprising, though, that screws aren't stainless by default, especially in Japan. I can't help but think this only cost a few ¥ per bike build. Well, in a month or two, I'll have my bike service and I will ask them to put that on the list.
 
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