another Newbie..

Aug 24, 2008
52
0
0
Shinagawa, Tokyo
#1
hi and good evening to everyone,

my first weekend in Tokyo and will be around for another 3yrs or so!:eek:

fyi, i went to a couple of bikeshops yesterday, around Ueno (Y's Road - friendly staffs:)) and Cycles Yokoo (bikeshop owner - old guy, had couple of pics with Merckx, very unfriendly:mad:)

at both places, i was having problem communicating. trying to ask the staffs if there's any organized Sunday rides around Tokyo area. they look very confused and unable to help with my question

i'm staying around Omori area (Minami-ooi), looking forward to meeting some new cycling buddies (english speaking hopefully:D)

in addition, im also looking for a shop to help me mount my tubular tires on the my Lightweight standard wheels. i have two very sore thumbs from attempting to mount it, 5-6hrs straight. gone thru the parktools website but no results so far. hopefully someone can give me pointers which shop to go to.

cheers and ride safe!:bike:
 
Aug 24, 2008
52
0
0
Shinagawa, Tokyo
#4
thanks Phil!

great!
i will look out on the rides on this forum.
looking forward to my first ride in Japan.

anyway, with regards to the issue im facing, i'm really hoping somebody can give me some pointers which bikeshop i can go to..
hopefully a shop who understands some english;)

thanks:)
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,661
477
103
Japan
#6
mounting tubulars shouldn't pose any problems, look for the oldest geezer in the shop. hold up a tubular and your rim, smile and say "DEKIMASKA?" watch him light up with glee and stoically reply "mochiron". Most bike parts use the borrowed english word so just talk slow and give people time to compose their thoughts when they reply back. Saturday and Sunday mornings are good times to meet the local riders who will at some stage probably drop in for a chat or parts. here is your tubular primer http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=101
 

Pucci

Speeding Up
Jul 12, 2006
283
1
38
Yokohama
#7
SEO can mount tubulars.

At the risk of being rude, however, I would advise you to learn to mount them yourself before you ride them. If you get a flat, then you will need to mount a spare alone.

You need to stretch the tires first.

1. Hook the tire around your heels and pull the other end hard. Put your back into it.

2. Mount the tire on an UNGLUED rim. Start at the valve and set the tire on the rim without tools. When you get to the hard final part, if the tire is really tight, take your shoes off and hook your toes over the rim. Pull with your back and the tire will pop onto the rim. Inflate to full pressure and leave for a few hours. This will stretch the tire so it is easy to put on a glued rim. Never try to mount an unstretched tire on a glued rim.

Next remove the tire and apply a generous coat of Panacement to the rim. Allow to dry for about 30 or 40 minutes. Glue will no longer be tacky to touch. Mount the tire, using the barefoot technique if necessary. Be sure to lift the last portion clear of the rim and drop the tire down onto the rim. Do not drag it on horizontally or it will make a gluey mess.

Alternatively, you can use the wonderful two sided tubular gluing tape sold by Miyata. Just apply to rim, peel off a corner of the backing so it sticks out after the tire is mounted. Inflate and center the tire and then pull the backing out from between the rim and tire. Done.

Hope this helps!
 
Aug 24, 2008
52
0
0
Shinagawa, Tokyo
#9
thanks Pucci..

SEO can mount tubulars.

At the risk of being rude, however, I would advise you to learn to mount them yourself before you ride them. If you get a flat, then you will need to mount a spare alone.

You need to stretch the tires first.

1. Hook the tire around your heels and pull the other end hard. Put your back into it.

2. Mount the tire on an UNGLUED rim. Start at the valve and set the tire on the rim without tools. When you get to the hard final part, if the tire is really tight, take your shoes off and hook your toes over the rim. Pull with your back and the tire will pop onto the rim. Inflate to full pressure and leave for a few hours. This will stretch the tire so it is easy to put on a glued rim. Never try to mount an unstretched tire on a glued rim.

Next remove the tire and apply a generous coat of Panacement to the rim. Allow to dry for about 30 or 40 minutes. Glue will no longer be tacky to touch. Mount the tire, using the barefoot technique if necessary. Be sure to lift the last portion clear of the rim and drop the tire down onto the rim. Do not drag it on horizontally or it will make a gluey mess.

Alternatively, you can use the wonderful two sided tubular gluing tape sold by Miyata. Just apply to rim, peel off a corner of the backing so it sticks out after the tire is mounted. Inflate and center the tire and then pull the backing out from between the rim and tire. Done.

Hope this helps!
you're not being rude, just giving me a good advice..:)
thanks!
yep, i should learn how to mount it, but somehow i have problem at the final part whereby even using my toes, i simply cant get it onto the rims! it's really crazy..mount it between 12pm to 5am on a Sunday morning and was left frustrated..
and in case u need to know, yes im using the double sided tape by Tufo - Extreme

cheers