After riding thru some glass

jdd

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..or other flints, is there any need to reach down and hold your gloved palm on your tires for a few rotations? The purpose being to rub off anything that may have stuck to the tire but not caused a puncture.

I do this front and back when I can, but I'm wondering if it's superstition or just pointless? (=things don't stick to tires, so they don't need rubbing off)
 

Almightyshoe

Cruising
Sep 6, 2012
28
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Tsukumi
I rub my hand over the tire too... purely out of paranoia, but there has been a few times where you do knock out a bit of a chunk that hasn't quite pierced the tire. Worth doing just in case I think :thumb:
 

Malte

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Sep 26, 2011
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I do this all the time - it's like a reflex. You feel that things fall off ... not sure what will happen if I wouldn't do it.
 

joewein

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It makes sense to me.

Some shards may have penetrated the rubber far enough to stick but not far enough to puncture yet, but if they remain there may gradually work their way deeper and deeper into the tyre. It's amzaing how much stuff you find in tyres after a while.

I recall somebody mentioning on TCC recently about one cyclist who made it a habit to clean his tyres with a wet sponge after every ride, to dislocate any shards he may have picked up, and having a very good record with avoiding punctures.
 

FarEast

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I do this all the time - it's like a reflex. You feel that things fall off ... not sure what will happen if I wouldn't do it.
Same here.
 

jdd

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Thanks for the replies. (some habits die hard) I guess the thing that nags at the back of my mind is that while I've felt stuff rub off, after doing this I've never had any little bits of glass or whatever lodged in my gloves.
 

StuInTokyo

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Many years ago that is what some old hands taught me, and is one of the best reasons to wear gloves, as well as protecting your hands when, not if, WHEN you crash.....:rolleyes:
 

joewein

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...and is one of the best reasons to wear gloves, as well as protecting your hands when, not if, WHEN you crash.....:rolleyes:
My cotton gloves were also the only thing I had on hand (literally) for wiping the blood off when I crashed... (I didn't carry any first aid stuff)
 

jdd

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Thanks for the replies. (some habits die hard) I guess the thing that nags at the back of my mind is that while I've felt stuff rub off, after doing this I've never had any little bits of glass or whatever lodged in my gloves.
So if my gloves are truly brushing something off, why is it that they never pick up any of those sharps off the tire?

Maybe Gunnar is right?
 

Malte

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Sep 26, 2011
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So if my gloves are truly brushing something off, why is it that they never pick up any of those sharps off the tire?

Maybe Gunnar is right?
If you are looking for a physical explanation then maybe imagine that rolling with the tire over something and wiping the tire off are two different actions with different friction factors.
 

GSAstuto

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Oct 11, 2009
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www.roadfixie.com
I only do this if something is actually stuck in the wheel - like a chunk of paving tar, roadkill, IED, etc. The last thing I want is crap stuck in my gloves which eventually I will wipe my face and then get it stuck there (or worse). Otherwise I just channel Chuck Norris and STARE the crap off my tire.
 

onm

Sep 2, 2009
5
0
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Yeah, not a fan of shoving my hand close to something which is essentially a massive, erm, fan.
 

WhiteGiant

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Only if it has been raining...

After the rain, you'll find a lot more detritus will stick to your wheels than when it's dry.
On average, you'll get more punctures from riding on wet roads than on dry.
Any sharp object that manages to cling on to the surface for a few rotations has more chance of being pushed in further each time the wheel goes around.

I do the front wheel, when necessary... BUT have yet to figure out how to do the rear wheel safely.
 

onm

Sep 2, 2009
5
0
0
BUT have yet to figure out how to do the rear wheel safely.
Unclip your strongest foot, bring your foot up, and rest the top of your shoe on the top the rear tyre.

Hammers your shoes though.

Don't try this on the front wheel EVER.