Accomodation Usual practice ?

Ronan

Warming-Up
Nov 22, 2012
8
0
1
Tokyo
#1
Hello Guys, i'm a french rider; i'd like to make a "long" (for me, because it might be short for some riders in this forums...) ride; around 300 kms for 3 days, from kawasaki to Fuji, and return back via Kamakura. Easy ride, with some good hills. I plan to make a stop for the night in Doshi (close to Lac Yamnaka), and a second night in Anabe (close to Odawara).I'm not in Japan since a long time, and i'll leave end of june, and i "only" had time to learn some basic words in Japanese language (so i'm not able to discuss with Japanese people, unfortunately...). I'd try to find hotel on site, but i had in mind also to ask to "local" people in the town if they can accomodate for the night. Is it possible in Japan ? It's not a money concern for me to go in hotel, but it's better to share information/ time with local people, but i'm not sure it is usual in japan. i'll take with me some "wording" & my translator book to try to discuss. Does anyone what a feedback on this ? I'd be in Dori on Friday evening (3rd May), and so if everythink is ok (my legs...), in Anabe Saturday 4th of May. Thanks for your advice !
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,424
862
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#2
I would compare the Japanese to the British and their "My Home is My Castle" attitude: Brits do not easily invite others into their homes and neither do the Japanese. I'm not saying it's not going to happen, but it would be unusual for someone to have a non-family member stay with them overnight if they are not running a "minshuku" (family pension, like a bed & breakfast place).

You will find more places to stay around Lake Yamanaka (Yamanakako) than in Doshi, which is quite rural. There are some camp grounds around Doshi though.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#3
Definitely second that. While Japan is very safe, generally friendly and super convenient, you are not likely to get invited for dinner at anyone's house. Hell, I have Japanese close friends and co-workers who've never invited my to a home dinner or party. Whilst traveling through Europe it was very common to have even strangers on the street strike a conversation and then invite me to their home for dinner, and many times, to stay a few days.

For lodging - you're best to look within short distances around the train stations - cause that's where the easy to book hotels will be located. For the more obscure onsen hotels, family inns, etc - you generally need to make reservations in advance. That's where having a Japanese friend to pre-book for you will help alot. And make sure to get the GPS location for the places you intend to stay - the local tourist maps are worthless.

May is still a bit chilly for camping - but not impossible. And if worse comes to worse, join the thousands of Japanese Salarymen coming home from a bender and missed the train and just crash out in a train station.

I would compare the Japanese to the British and their "My Home is My Castle" attitude: Brits do not easily invite others into their homes and neither do the Japanese. I'm not saying it's not going to happen, but it would be unusual for someone to have a non-family member stay with them overnight if they are not running a "minshuku" (family pension, like a bed & breakfast place).

You will find more places to stay around Lake Yamanaka (Yamanakako) than in Doshi, which is quite rural. There are some camp grounds around Doshi though.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#4
Oh. I forgot one thing. You can also crash out in Family Restaurants. Like GUSTO, Jonathan's, Denny's, Saizeria. Just purchase a 'drink bar' - usually about 260yen - and the staff will let you stay pretty much as long as you like and don't disturb other customers. Those restaurants are also one of the few places you can get enough fuel volume to carrying a good cycling pace. Otherwise you'll find yourself eating about EU50-60 of junk food in Convenience stores. The lack of legumes and whole grains in the domestic diet is quite different than the average 'bio' centric diet of most Europeans (and Americans).
 
Sep 2, 2009
5
0
0
#5
Oh. I forgot one thing. You can also crash out in Family Restaurants. Like GUSTO, Jonathan's, Denny's, Saizeria. Just purchase a 'drink bar' - usually about 260yen - and the staff will let you stay pretty much as long as you like and don't disturb other customers. Those restaurants are also one of the few places you can get enough fuel volume to carrying a good cycling pace. Otherwise you'll find yourself eating about EU50-60 of junk food in Convenience stores. The lack of legumes and whole grains in the domestic diet is quite different than the average 'bio' centric diet of most Europeans (and Americans).
Yeah, that is very true and a good suggestion. Convenience Store food is fairly incompatible with riding, and when I spend a day riding and fueling from them, I feel awful at the end; all headaches and toxicy, like when you eat a McDonalds'.
 

Ronan

Warming-Up
Nov 22, 2012
8
0
1
Tokyo
#6
Hello to all, thanks for your very good advices; For japanese invitation in their home, it is also what i understood/felt from some japanese collegues. I'll try and give the results, but fore sure my poor japanese language won't help...