3 foot passing law in California

Ludwig

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Oct 9, 2008
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#2
Why doesn't he simply propose a bill that makes it legal to mow down cyclists for now reason?? Three feet is one meter - hardly a great safety margin. And most American roads leave plenty of space for a larger car to pass a cyclist with a bigger safety margin.
 

Ludwig

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Oct 9, 2008
871
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Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
#4
In Germany, most cars actually pass cyclists like this, but at high speed and into oncoming traffic, which is sometimes more scary than Japanese passing at low speed but without much of a margin.
 

GSAstuto

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Oct 11, 2009
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www.roadfixie.com
#6
Cyclists should take at least 1m space from the curbside when riding. This more or less forces the driver to cross the center - and thus, they'll give you more leeway. try it sometime. If you gutter crawl, the drivers will try to slip by you within the lane - even with oncoming traffic - thus making a hazerdous pass even more so because you have absolutely zero recovery room. Plus you'll get fewer flats since you are riding in a tire track rather than the tire refuse portion of the lane.
 

kiwisimon

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Dec 14, 2006
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#7
Cyclists should take at least 1m space from the curbside when riding. This more or less forces the driver to cross the center - and thus, they'll give you more leeway. try it sometime. If you gutter crawl, the drivers will try to slip by you within the lane - even with oncoming traffic - thus making a hazardous pass even more so because you have absolutely zero recovery room. Plus you'll get fewer flats since you are riding in a tire track rather than the tire refuse portion of the lane.
Good advice, don't be gutter bait: Same applies on motorcycles.
 

Malte

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Sep 26, 2011
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#8
In Germany, most cars actually pass cyclists like this, but at high speed and into oncoming traffic, which is sometimes more scary than Japanese passing at low speed but without much of a margin.
I experienced much more scary overtaking maneuver here in Japan, especially as it they are crawling forward just 10cm from your handlebars even though the other side of the road is completely empty (but hey it's a straight line on the road so they learned its bad to cross it). Here I am always tempted to knock on the car doors while they pass by me.
 

Malte

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Sep 26, 2011
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#9
Cyclists should take at least 1m space from the curbside when riding. This more or less forces the driver to cross the center - and thus, they'll give you more leeway. try it sometime. If you gutter crawl, the drivers will try to slip by you within the lane - even with oncoming traffic - thus making a hazerdous pass even more so because you have absolutely zero recovery room. Plus you'll get fewer flats since you are riding in a tire track rather than the tire refuse portion of the lane.
I can just agree to this one. For many cyclist it seems counter-intuitive but it's a bad idea to hide in the gutter. Maybe some drivers will give you a horn but that's ok :p.
 

Ludwig

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Oct 9, 2008
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Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
#10
I try to ride quite into the lane to slow down especially trucks. And also to avoid the most bumpy part of the road, which kills my back. Actually it has now happened even with this precaution and I will be off the bike for the foreseeable future. :eek:uch:
 
Oct 15, 2010
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#13
That is sad news Ludwig. I only got a chance to ride with you once on the Best of the West trip. Surely someone can tell you how to fix the problem. It it only happens when you are on your bike, perhaps there is something wrong with your bike set up or technique? I don't remember reading about others having to give up biking because of a sore back. You are still young, right? You have had a CT scan and spoken with sports physiologists?
 

Ludwig

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Oct 9, 2008
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#14
Thanks, John, and also HF Mike, by private mail.

I have a spinal disk herniation (prolapsus disci intervertebralis). This is causing a lot of pain on my left lower back, now extending into my left leg too. It has rapidly got worse over the past week, day by day. The pain is so bad sometimes I can hardly focus on work, and cannot fall back asleep early in the morning. Sitting and lying down makes things worse, standing and walking better.

I have not tried to sit on a bike since things deteriorated. Cycling has always produced back problems during the ride, so I don't dare to even try out what cycling would do now.

I've had an MRI done which has confirmed the diagnosis, but the doctor I'm seeing doesn't really want to tell me where this is going to lead. Most cases get simply better with waiting, pain treatment and physio therapy. My concern is that cycling will always harm the back - so I'm wondering whether I need to look into more radical options.
 

kiwisimon

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#15
I have a spinal disk herniation (prolapsus disci intervertebralis). . Most cases get simply better with waiting, pain treatment and physio therapy. My concern is that cycling will always harm the back - so I'm wondering whether I need to look into more radical options.
Had the same thing some years back. I was told 3 months no sport! So I didn't. I slowly got better. Give it time and rest, daily physio helped me. Keep exploring your options.
 

Wolfman

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Jul 31, 2007
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Suginamiku
#16
I'm sorry to hear about your bad back Ludwig.

My wife suffers from this - sometimes she can't even walk - when it get like that she goes to a chiropractor near Omotesando who sorts her out and makes things bearable. Swears by him if you want to give it a try.

Lee
 

Ludwig

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Oct 9, 2008
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#18
My wife suffers from this - sometimes she can't even walk - when it get like that she goes to a chiropractor near Omotesando who sorts her out and makes things bearable. Swears by him if you want to give it a try.
Yesterday, I got "electro therapy" - i.e. a strong current put through my back. That worked almost wonders, though the pain is slowly creeping back. I'm now also on an NSAID to keep the pain down. I think I will need to explore also other options.

I'm pretty sure I can get the pain under control with time, but my main worry is what cycling will do to this, as it has always made things worse.:(
 

kiwisimon

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#19
So no symptoms these days? Even when you do hard rides?
I know the potential for the injury is there and in my mind I think I feel the occasional twitch in my thigh, but generally now even after playing rugby and riding hard I have no pain from the disc pinching the nerve. The doctor gave me the choice, "rest until it gets better or finish your sporting life" I am not a professional athlete and my family doesn't need me to play sports for a living so I rested. Mine was in the lower lumbar so it was pressing my sciatica nerve locking my left leg into a semi paralised state. I couldn't take a step longer than 10cm when I first woke up with the problem. Like most injuries they differ from patient to patient and especially backs there are some many bits and pieces down there no two injuries are the same. Follow your doctors advice and as with all medical matters dont hesitate to get a second or third opinion.
 

kiwisimon

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#20
Yesterday, I got "electro therapy" - i.e. a strong current put through my back. That worked almost wonders, though the pain is slowly creeping back.
I'm pretty sure I can get the pain under control with time, but my main worry is what cycling will do to this, as it has always made things worse.:(
Electro does work well as does direct massage. A good doctor will/ should be able to give you an exercise regimine to help prevent similar reoccurances.
Perhaps a radical change in your bike setup or style might be needed, BUT first get better!