10 speed Cassette spacer

zenbiker

Maximum Pace
Mar 4, 2008
802
228
63
Chofu
#1
Both my Dura-ace wheel sets say to use a spacer with a 10 speed cassette.
I use a mix of Sram and Shimano cassettes(10s) with no spacer on Sram Red groupset. Everything shifts fine and dandy.
Question:
Should I pop in a spacer?
 

Wolfman

Speeding Up
Jul 31, 2007
631
18
38
Suginamiku
#2
I have an ultegra 10 speed on my trainer wheel. I couldn't be bothered to put the spacer in and now I really need to be careful of shifting too far to the right - the chain goes off into the gap. Fine on the trainer; would be a bit reluctant on the road.

I'm no mechanic but you'd probably know as above if the spacer was really required.
 

TOM

Maximum Pace
#3
I always wondered what would happen to the chain without the spacer...dropping into the gap! That makes sense, although I still do not quite understand why while a 9-speed doesn't need the spacer ring a 10-speed cassette does...logically thinking it should be the opposite:confused:

I guess the function of that spacer ring will always remain a mystery to a poor mechanic like myself.

Considering the fact that most Shimano people ride with 10-speed cassettes, why does Shimano still produce 8-9-10 freehub wheels and not 10-speed only ones?



I have an ultegra 10 speed on my trainer wheel. I couldn't be bothered to put the spacer in and now I really need to be careful of shifting too far to the right - the chain goes off into the gap. Fine on the trainer; would be a bit reluctant on the road.

I'm no mechanic but you'd probably know as above if the spacer was really required.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#4
10 speed cassette is slightly wider and by not placing the spacer the derailer is forced very close and sometimes in to the spokes when shifting in to the low ratios. The spacer is to stop this from happening.
 

Phil

Maximum Pace
#5
Do you mean the 1 mm or so spacer ring that mounts between the cassette and wheel?

IIRC, this is for fitting 10-speed cassettes onto 9-speed compatible freehubs (the latter are slightly longer). Basically, if you mount the cassette and you can tighten the lockring so there's no play in the sprockets, then you don't need it. If there is side-to-side play, then you need it.
 

Wolfman

Speeding Up
Jul 31, 2007
631
18
38
Suginamiku
#6
10 speed cassette is slightly wider and by not placing the spacer the derailer is forced very close and sometimes in to the spokes when shifting in to the low ratios. The spacer is to stop this from happening.
No, in my case it's the other side of the cassette; the gap between the cassette and the chain/seat stays.

There is a hooking great gap between the cassette and the lock ring which tightens the cassette onto the wheel. Shift down too much and the chain lands on this lockring; no problems going into the lower gears.
 

zenbiker

Maximum Pace
Mar 4, 2008
802
228
63
Chofu
#8
The spacer goes between the wheel and the cassette doesn`t it?
Just bought 2 so will fit them and then re-dial in the RD.

Do Easton`s require a spacer too?
 

Phil

Maximum Pace
#9
Do Easton`s require a spacer too?
My EA70s did, but that was a few years ago; new models might just be provided with 10-speed freehubs. If you don't have the info in a manual etc, surest way to check is as above, to mount the cassette without a spacer, and if the sprockets are still loose after tightening down the lockring, then you need the spacer, otherwise you're fine.

(Yes, the spacer goes between wheel and cassette. It's only purpose is to enable 10-speed cassettes to be mounted on 9/8 speed hubs; aligning the RD so it doesn't drop the chain/hit the spokes is the job of the adjustment screws on the RD itself.)
 
Sep 2, 2009
5
0
0
#10
Spacers are wheel specific, rather than cassette specific, are they not?

By that, I mean the spacer will have come with the wheelset (if you bought a wheelset), rather than the cassette.

As usual, when it comes to these things, I am often wrong however, but that has been my experience with road bikes thus far...
 

Wolfman

Speeding Up
Jul 31, 2007
631
18
38
Suginamiku
#11
Spacers are wheel specific, rather than cassette specific, are they not?

By that, I mean the spacer will have come with the wheelset (if you bought a wheelset), rather than the cassette.

As usual, when it comes to these things, I am often wrong however, but that has been my experience with road bikes thus far...
I think you're right. I had no spacer with my new DA cassette or spacer with my new wheels.
 
Sep 2, 2009
5
0
0
#12
Yeah, when I swapped between Shimano and Mavic wheels, the spacers were different thicknesses (quite noticeable actually, like over 1mm).

The Shimano wheels came with the bike. The Mavics I bought after.

The cassette was the same, of course, and worked fine with both wheels

Then I got a DA cassette, and it came with no spacer, and continued to work fine with the Mavics, using the spacer Mavic provided (of course).
 

zenbiker

Maximum Pace
Mar 4, 2008
802
228
63
Chofu
#13
I have 2 sets of Dura-ace wheels, neither came with a spacer but both advise the use of a spacer for 10S cassette.
My new 10S cassette (ultegra) has a spacer which I guess I`ll use!:eek:
 
Jan 25, 2011
29
0
0
London, south.
#14
I would normally be guided by how the lockring tightens on the cassette. You should feel the clicks of the lockring all the way until tight after several turns of the lockring. If it feels smooth then it`s just tightening on the freehub body rather than the small sprocket, which has serrations to match the lockring. Then adjust RD stops to suit. Cassette position may vary depending on the hub.
Manufacturers reccomendations on spacers are sometimes suspect. For example; Mavic produced their Campag 11 speed compatible hubs based on Campag prototypes. Campag then changed them so that mavic had to produce a super slim spacer to make them work, at least on R-sys wheels, so i would always try it and see.
Always be careful that the RD cannot throw the chain into the spokes (adjusted by the lower screw on a Shimano RD), this can be very expensive. I`ve even seen frames destroyed due to this, as well as wheels, RD, chain etc.